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mbenam

New here - looking for advice

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Hello,

 

Just joined this amazing and helpful forum. Looking through different options for my first purchase. Hopefully I will be able to buy a kamado and contribute to the forum. BTW, located in Baton Rouge LA.

 

Thanks everyone.

 

 

 

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Welcome!  Go buy a Kamado and get kooking!  

 

Consider Warranty and extras.  Primo, Kamado Joe, BGE, and Vision  are a good bet.  There are many other good ones on the market, it will boil down to your preference.  Make sure you get a full lifetime warranty no matter what you buy, all of the ones I mention have a full warranty and a good track record.

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Welcome! Many of us, myself included, started with an Akorn and then moved up to ceramic in a few years. In my case, I moved up from the Akorn to a KJ Classic I and highly recommend the KJ Kamado. KJ has upgraded from the Classic I to the Classic II and III. There is also the Big Joe, but I don't know all of the iterations.

 

Compared to BGE, my opinion is that you get much more bang-for-your-buck with the KJ and you're paying for brand recognition with the BGE.

 

The regulars on this site have tons of experience and are a friendly and helpful group, although there is lively debate...

 

Good luck on your journey!

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Welcome from a LSU guy.  I'm in the group that started in the Kamado world with a Akorn and then bought a Joe Classic.  For what I do it serves most of my needs.  I'm adding a gasser so I can move more of my cooking (frying, smoky stuff) out of the house and am doing a lot more baking on the Joe..  Good luck in your search.

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Welcome to the Guru.  There are a lot of grills out there to choose from and it can make the selection process confusing.  I suggest you take a look at the section of this forum called 'Talk about your cooker'.  If you trust 'herd wisdom',  use it to skinny down your list to the top 3 most popular brands.   Best of luck!

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Thank you all for your worm welcome. My quest started when I was looking for an outdoor pizza oven. I was looking to get a Napoli or a Ooni. Then I stumbled into Kamado. It seems that it will cook pizza as well as work as a smoker, tandoor, grill... choices seem to be unlimited. And now here I am looking for a Kamado.

 

One thing I wanted to ask you guys. I know pizza takes quite a high temperature of 600-700 degrees. Let say I want to throw a pizza party. Can Kamados continue to generate heat for 8-10 pizzas? Is this continuous high heat bad for the longevity of the grill?

 

Again thank you all for the worm welcome.

 

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If your primary focus is pizza, and I might take heat for this comment, a kamado is really not the best tool for this singular job. Of course, you can make killer pizza on a Kamado, and I like to think I do :), it’s not the ideal tool for the job, but a very versatile tool for lots of different cooks, low-and-slow, baking, grilling, etc. and definitely serviceable for darn good pizza. 

 

i would suggest the KJ and DoJoe for emulating a WFO, but it’ll only get up to about 650*F in my experience and probably not make it through 8-10 pizzas without refueling. Maybe 4-6 pizzas? Definitely not up to Neapolitan temps, and I think @John Setzler, our grand high exalted mystic leader, would counsel against Neapolitan temps on a ceramic Kamado. 

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I dont care if folks wanna run their kamados at 900f.  I am tired of preaching against it.  Kamados make great pizzas.  They just arent the best tool for neapolitan style pizza.  You can make them do it but its a fake process at best.  When you open the lid on a 900 degree kamado you lode enough heat that it isnt going to come back in the time time it takes to cook that pizza.  Everyone is so picky about specifics when it comes to cooking techniques, its just not worth time to argue :)

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Don't know about Neapolitan pizza, cause I just cook pizza.  I have the top vent open about half way after it reaches 500+ and shine my very good flashlight beam down the top and watch the cheese brown.  Never have to open the dome until I have just the right color.  Never have an occasion to cook 8-10 pizzas at a time.  Don't know that many people I'm that fond of.  :roll:

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20 hours ago, BURGER MEISTER said:

 Don't know that many people I'm that fond of.  :roll:

Actually, I don't know that many people I'd let in my house.  But I have made some really great pizzas for 4 on my Joe.

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On 9/28/2019 at 12:14 PM, mbenam said:

Hello,

 

Just joined this amazing and helpful forum. Looking through different options for my first purchase. Hopefully I will be able to buy a kamado and contribute to the forum. BTW, located in Baton Rouge LA.

 

Thanks everyone.

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the site.  I've owned 4 Big Green Eggs and more recently just bought my second Kamado Joe Classic III so its safe to say Ive got the Kamado bug.

 

When it comes to picking a BBQ I will use the analogy of vehicles for a moment.  There are sports cars, coupes, sedans, trucks, vans, convertibles etc. which all serve a specific niche.  A two seater sports car won't do well bringing home construction supplies from home depot, and a cargo van might not perform well or be fun to drive at all but it has no issue with a full load of drywall.

 

Coming back to BBQ's a pizza oven is a dedicated tool that if the only thing you will ever do is cook 8-10 pizzas than a pizza oven.  If all you will ever do is really long low & slow cooks a stick burner is probably your best bet.

 

I love the Kamado Joe because its the sport utility vehicle of BBQ's.  It does everything well, and some things better than any other option.  I can do low and slow smoking, hot and fast for a steak, pizzas, rotisserie chicken, baking a pie, dehydrating hot peppers etc.  I've done all of those things and turned out some great food.

 

If you're looking at a ceramic grill, the KJ is hands down the best I've used.  Sure the few times a year you need to turn out 8+ pizzas it might be not as convenient but a pie off the KJ using the DoJoe is pretty darn good. 

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I bought an Akorn, Jr. at Wal-Mart and have never looked back.  I like having a lightweight, sturdy kamado that I can take with me on camping trips ... and the fact that it cost me a little less than $200 is a very nice bonus. :)

 

I treat it as a charcoal-fired convection oven, not "a charcoal grill."  Light the charcoal with a chimney starter, pour it in, bring the temperature to 300ºF as indicated by the dome thermometer, insert the remote-reading electronic thermometer probe into the meat (hanging the electronics unit from an improvised hook), and begin cooking.  (If I want to "sear" the meat, I do that with my cast-iron skillet in the kitchen on the stove.)

 

 

If I want "smoke," soaked wood-chips are put in an envelope made of aluminum foil with a couple of fork-holes.  I'm really a very low-tech guy. ;-)

 

The thing that I love most about kamado is the dependability.  It cooks the food evenly and slowly.  It comes up to the desired temperature and can be made to "park" there for hours with very little supervision.  I've learned how to get excellent results each and every time – "almost."  I can for the most part "set it and fuhgeddaboudit" as I enjoy my first glass of wine, and I almost always have charcoal left over!

 

In my opinion, a good remote-reading digital thermometer is essential.  You need to know what the internal temperature of the meat is, without constantly opening the lid.  And, for predictably repeatable delicious results, your process needs to be guided by this data.  (The dome thermometer will give you a quick indication if you need to nudge the vents, but IMHO it's not meant to be a cooking thermometer.)

 

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