Jump to content

Japanese Knives & update from not posting for awhile


Cavman
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone! Been awhile! Been focused on summer road trips and my new girlfriend, who is the best match for me I have ever met. She is not really into cooking/smoking, she likes my cooking though, long as it isn't spicy or fish. Working on that in baby steps. Served he a NY strip with salt pepper and Weber smokey mesquite on it and she was boasting the next morning about eating and liking a spiced steak. Didn't even consider that would cross a line. When camping it has always been sal & pepper. That was first steak at home. I racked up 4000 miles on the bike with her over 3 months this summer. Mostly camping.  I guess that should be it's own thread but on to the knives.

 

So my 58th birthday is little more than a week away. I appreciate nice knives and have a nice preforming collection. I have followed many threads here about Japanese knives and longed to own one. I have used Kiwi Nakari's for years and recently recieved a Dalstrong Nakari as a gift. While asian influenced not a true Japanese knife. I ordered Friday a Kai Wasabi Yanagiba 8 1/4 inch long. I chose this speciaty knife because I wanted something radically different from my Nakiri's and Chef knives. I will be ordering wet stones and pond next couple pay checks. Been watching Burrfections sharpening stones and passion for Japanese knives. I am well aware I won't use this knife a lot, hence the reluctance to spend more for a Shun or others, but I have to see what this is all about and this is my entry. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to think I know a thing or two about jknives. You may want to look into some of the kitchen knife forums such as kitchenknifeforum.com and Chefknivestogoforums.com.  Just an FYI, don’t mention one site to the other, there are conflicting personalities.  There is also tons of info on knives and sharpening.   I have simple, but strong opinions, I am happy to share.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, gander2112 said:

Nice. I have a set from a small Japanese knife maker (bought them probably 15 years ago) and without a doubt, they are my daily go to knives.

 

This is the maker: Watanabe

 

Prices were good, and the quality is excellent

Wantanabe are not cheap!  They are very well regarded and worth every penny (not the handles). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Ben S said:

Wantanabe are not cheap!  They are very well regarded and worth every penny (not the handles). 

 

I think I paid $200 or so for the 5 knife set when I bought them. Apparently Watanabe-san has figured out that his knives are awesome, and the world will pay more. His website is much more sophisticated than it was in 2008 too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the support all. Knives are one of those subjects that can be touchy. Opinions are strong and usually a mix of fact, experience and personal preferences. Those knives are far beyond my paygrade, but I do have appreciation for nice cutlery. My Dalstrongs and Henckles are reserved for special occasions as I suspect my Kai will as well. I am cutting pork steaks out of a pork butt for a work potluck Wed. I will debone with my Old Hickory boning knife and try my Yanagiba out slicing the steaks from the roast instead of my trusty 10" Old Hickory #7 that has cut up a ton of pork butts and briskets. I am sure it would be the ultimate knife for slicing the thin strips from pork butt for pork on a stick. Which will be tried out as well. I will update afterwords. I am looking forward to getting all my sharpening supplies for the Yanagiba to see how far I can take it. I am planning on the King 1000/6000 based on cost, reviews and Burfections recomendations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Cavman said:

Thanks for the support all. Knives are one of those subjects that can be touchy. Opinions are strong and usually a mix of fact, experience and personal preferences. Those knives are far beyond my paygrade, but I do have appreciation for nice cutlery. My Dalstrongs and Henckles are reserved for special occasions as I suspect my Kai will as well. I am cutting pork steaks out of a pork butt for a work potluck Wed. I will debone with my Old Hickory boning knife and try my Yanagiba out slicing the steaks from the roast instead of my trusty 10" Old Hickory #7 that has cut up a ton of pork butts and briskets. I am sure it would be the ultimate knife for slicing the thin strips from pork butt for pork on a stick. Which will be tried out as well. I will update afterwords. I am looking forward to getting all my sharpening supplies for the Yanagiba to see how far I can take it. I am planning on the King 1000/6000 based on cost, reviews and Burfections recomendations.


 

as a generally rule of sharpening basics... take your 1k stone and sharpen until it is so sharp hair pops off your arm while shaving.  Only then should you bother changing grits.  
 

sharpen one side until you raise a burr, flip to the other side and flip the burr over.  Make summer you use the same number of strokes.  Then deburr. I like to do this with stropping motions on the stone. You should be able to cleanly cut hanging paper towels.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Ben, I know to get it sharp before moving on, but would never expected to cut a hanging paper towel. Most of my knives will push cut a post it and I consider that sharp. But they are all general use an I don't go to the more extreme stones with them. This Yaganiba is intended for those exteremes. I think I will add a Kai Wasaba Deba next, but think it will stop at the 1000 stone. Time and experience will tell. New obsession, new learning curve. If this goes as expected, will be gifting a couple of sharpened Deba's for Christmas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just tested my 6" Dalstrong Chef knife, it cuts paper towel clean as post it notes, much to my surprise, but not free hanging. My Old Hickory's as well, but with a little resistance. Difference being OH knives stone sharpened, maintained on steels. Dalstrongs never touch a steel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Cavman said:

Just tested my 6" Dalstrong Chef knife, it cuts paper towel clean as post it notes, much to my surprise, but not free hanging. My Old Hickory's as well, but with a little resistance. Difference being OH knives stone sharpened, maintained on steels. Dalstrongs never touch a steel.


I have found simple carbon steel is the best to learn sharpening on.  I suspect your old hickory falls in that category.  I taught myself on a $50 tojiro nakiri.  Stay away from from cheap stainless until you know what you are doing. 
 

fyi. Burfection gets mixed reviews according to most knife nuts. This guys is one of many who is very well respected. 
 

 

 

i am not this good at sharpening... I am happy if I can cut 3-4 clean inches. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So my knife arrived today and I am very impressed with the feel and cosmetics of it. It is not as sharp out of the box as I had hoped/expected, but realisically it is probably the sharpest kitchen knife out of the box that I have purchased. However it is not as sharp as my existing knives. I won't attemp to sharpen it until I purchase water stones. I was disapointed to find micro bevels on it, but not surprised because I recently read Shun has them as well. 

 

I tested it on a tomato like a video I saw and it did not match the performance of what was supposedly out of the box. I will try slicing pork butt for pork on a stick tomorrow night. So for the moment, not sorry I bought it, anxious to sharpen it and see how it performs, but will have to be patient.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Cavman said:

I am going to pick up a cheap knife at the thrift store to practice on the water stones with as the technique I find on all the videos is far different than what I have done


Careful on the steel choice.  Cheap stainless can be much harder to sharpen than Simple carbon steels.  I have spent 10x the time on cheap SS knives compared to simple carbon steels with vastly inferior results. I thought I was going crazy until I switched knives.  Raise burr, flip burr remove burr.   If this doesn’t make sense, head over the the Chefknivestogo forum and watch sone of the basic sharpening videos. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some Yaxell Dragon knives and they are made from BD1N steel. They are a difficult to sharpen but really hold an edge. I have a set of Sigma Power stones and only have to run my knives through them about every 6 months.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...