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pmillen

What Beef Roast Should I Serve?

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We’re having a dinner party in a few days.  I’m asking for help in selecting a cut of meat and the companion recipe.

 

I’d like to serve smoke-roasted beef, preferably a Beef Tenderloin, a Ribeye Roast, a New York Strip Loin Roast or a Prime Rib Roast.  Please offer up your favorite recipe–

  • Would you trim the fat to expose more meat to the rub?
  • What rub do you recommend?
  • Dry brine it in the refrigerator?
  • Smoke wood choice?
  • Would you sear it?  (I have switched from reverse sear back to searing first or just not searing.)
  • What pit temperature do you recommend?
  • And any other important information.

 

I know it’s bold of me to ask so much and an imposition on you to comply, but I’d kinda’ like to make this cook a winner and I don’t see another way, given the short timeline for trials.

 

NOTE:  I couldn’t figure out the best location for this post.  I won’t be troubled if a Moderator moves it.

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I'll answer your questions in order:

Any of those will be great, but tenderloin has the least amount of fat, so you'll need to be more careful. I always do ribeye roasts, like Johns thread below

 

Onto your list:

Yes, I would leave about 1/4" max, and trim all the "hard" fat

Beef likes salt and pepper, but Johns video is great too

Yes, 100% yes, I let mine go for almost a week, you get a litttttle bit of the funk that way, which I like

OAK, with maybe a small piece of cherry for color

Yes

Bring it up to temp low and then blast it, or blast it and then go low, low being in that 225-275 range

Nope! Good luck!

 

 

Johns Thread, I've done this, it was SUPERB, and the leftovers made just killer sandwiches

 

 

I have also done this, in my ::ducks:: oven, and it was SUPERB. I know this is a kamado forum and all, but good lord above it was amazing. I let mine dry brine/age for 10 days, it was so SO SO good. Like, top 5 best thing i have ever made good, we're currently expecting, and my wife has asked for this as her "reintroduction to rare meat" post pregnancy meal

https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/step-by-step-food-lab-reverse-sear-prime-rib.html

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You're thinking like a steakhouse, serving fine cuts of meat.

Think like a smoker, and look at less-than-fine cuts of meat. 

 

My favorite cut of beef for smoking is London Broil. It's not the most tender, even when cut thin, across the grain, but it is among the most flavorful. I've done it for groups many times and never had leftovers. My favorite day-of group cook. It just needs a little garlic pepper...

 

Election Day (Go Vote) gets me out, and the rain is clearing so I think this is getting me beef shopping. 

 

Have fun,

Frank

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It's hard to go wrong with a prime rib (same as a ribeye roast.)  I like to season/salt mine in advance by at least 8 hours.  I then make up a wet rub and simply smoke the roast at 225-250 until I get to 127-128F internal.  Then i let it rest 30 minutes or so before slicing.  My wet rub is 3T paprika, 2T chopped rosemary, 1T chopped thyme, and 6T extra virgin olive oil.

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I go +1 on the Prime Rib roast and I go for simplicity.

 

I just did one this past weekend and it came out great. I seasoned about 2-3 hours before putting on the KJ with salt, pepper and garlic.  My ratio was 50% pepper, 25% salt, 25% garlic.  Make sure you let it rest on your kitchen counter for at least 2 hours to bring it close to room temp before putting on the cooker because I find that helps with getting a good uniform cook.  

 

I did a fairly robust coating of my rub.  

 

In terms of smoke, I used a combination of Apple 75% and Hickory 25%, but I was cooking at a temp where it didn't get a lot of smoke.  I cooked at 375F until I got to an internal of 130F, which took me a little over 2 hours (not a huge roast).  It was a big hit.

 

I like a Prime Rib Roast, simply because I find you get the best of all worlds.  It might be the most flavorful of all roasts, yet it is also super tender.  The only downside is that some people don't like the fat content of a PRR, but you can't please all of the people all of the time!

 

Good Luck!!!

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3 hours ago, John Setzler said:

It's hard to go wrong with a prime rib (same as a ribeye roast.)

 

It’s been many years since I worked cutting beef at my father’s tutelage (he was the butcher, I was the lackey) but I, too, always thought of them as the same.  Then I saw them stacked side by side with differing labels.  The meat counter guy used a lot of words to say that they’re different.

 

Then I found this…

https://www.reference.com/food/difference-between-rib-eye-roast-prime-rib-9d7eefddd6ece1a5

 

Still, it's all the same to me, too.

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4 hours ago, pmillen said:

 

It’s been many years since I worked cutting beef at my father’s tutelage (he was the butcher, I was the lackey) but I, too, always thought of them as the same.  Then I saw them stacked side by side with differing labels.  The meat counter guy used a lot of words to say that they’re different.

 

Then I found this…

https://www.reference.com/food/difference-between-rib-eye-roast-prime-rib-9d7eefddd6ece1a5

 

Still, it's all the same to me, too.

 

I guess butchers consider bone-in to be a prime rib.. Not a major difference IMO.  I prefer cooking them without the bone anyway :)

 

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On 11/4/2019 at 2:45 PM, KJTerp said:

I'll answer your questions in order:

Any of those will be great, but tenderloin has the least amount of fat, so you'll need to be more careful. I always do ribeye roasts, like Johns thread below

 

Onto your list:

Yes, I would leave about 1/4" max, and trim all the "hard" fat

Beef likes salt and pepper, but Johns video is great too

Yes, 100% yes, I let mine go for almost a week, you get a litttttle bit of the funk that way, which I like

OAK, with maybe a small piece of cherry for color

Yes

Bring it up to temp low and then blast it, or blast it and then go low, low being in that 225-275 range

Nope! Good luck!

 

 

Johns Thread, I've done this, it was SUPERB, and the leftovers made just killer sandwiches

 

 

I have also done this, in my ::ducks:: oven, and it was SUPERB. I know this is a kamado forum and all, but good lord above it was amazing. I let mine dry brine/age for 10 days, it was so SO SO good. Like, top 5 best thing i have ever made good, we're currently expecting, and my wife has asked for this as her "reintroduction to rare meat" post pregnancy meal

https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/step-by-step-food-lab-reverse-sear-prime-rib.html

Thanks for the link, man. I too do prime rib roasts on the rare occasion I do a large roast. In the past I have reverse seared. Had great results. Look forward to trying this Dutch oven method. Perhaps on Turkey day.

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7 hours ago, pmillen said:

 

It’s been many years since I worked cutting beef at my father’s tutelage (he was the butcher, I was the lackey) but I, too, always thought of them as the same.  Then I saw them stacked side by side with differing labels.  The meat counter guy used a lot of words to say that they’re different.

 

Then I found this…

https://www.reference.com/food/difference-between-rib-eye-roast-prime-rib-9d7eefddd6ece1a5

 

Still, it's all the same to me, too.

Ah ha, I  always thought the two were the same. Appears in most ways they are, but the bones are the key. Thx.

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To close this out...I used my new Karubque C-60 (KBQ) to roast a 19 lb. prime rib roast.  I followed the John Setzler method that KJTerp recommended above.  It was to everyone's liking.

 

I think that the next time I do it I'll give the meat a bit more smoke flavor which is easy to do with the KBQ.  However, I need to be cautious about adding more smoke because after standing in the smoke for a few hours I become desensitized to it and don't notice the smoke flavor to the same extent as my guests do.

 

I was told that taking a shower and changing clothes while the meat is resting helps to return the pitmaster to smoke-taste normalcy.

Edited by pmillen

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