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Burntweenie

Has Anyone Done A Brined Spatchcock Turkey???

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I've been nominated to do a smoked turkey for Thanksgiving and I'm thinking about using Meat Church Bird Bath brine and spackcock method. Thoughts??? Any and all input is greatly appreciated!

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I have fried many fantastic brined turkeys. In addition to frying a brined turkey for Thanksgiving the past ten years or so, for the last two years I have also smoked or roasted one using MeatHead's dry brining technique, the latest one spatchcocked. The fried turkey was superior by the slimmest of margins. 

This year the plan is to wet brine both to compare only the cooking method. My brine is simple: Tony's (salt), sugar, garlic and onion. Mmmmmmm, Good! It has never let me down. I imagine it will work well for the Akorn. If it beats the fried... that would be earth shattering! 

May the best turkey win! 

I imagine your turkey will be delicious! 

Good Luck! 

PS I don't know if you know this but I learned from MeatHead about how to carve the spatchcocked bird. It's awesome and easy! 

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I did one 3 weeks ago and it came out great.  Brined it to John Setzler's recipe. Thinking of doing it intact in two weeks.  I cut the wings off and placed them to the outside of the heat deflector and they cooked fast.  Had them for lunch.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=john+setzler+spatchcock+turkey&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS714US714&oq=john+setzler&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0j69i59j0j69i60j69i61.6133j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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3 hours ago, Golf Griller said:

Chef Tom from ATBBQ has a video on brining a spatchcocked turkey and then smoking it.

 

 

That is the best turkey spatchcock and trimming technique I have seen.  His technique for exposing the meat under the skin seems aggressive but no apparent downside and all upside.  I will replicate. 

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Wet brining works well for us. I think there can be great results from dry brining but not with Tony's. 

If I thoughtfully prepared the Simon & Garfunkel, leaning towards spices I like, I might enjoy a dry brined smoked/roasted bird even more. 

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I did some testing with whole chickens this weekend and figured out what I'm going to do with the turkey. I did 2 brined (bird bath brine) chickens one rubbed Honey Bacon BBQ and the other with Cattleman's Ranchero and one not brined but injected with creole butter and rubbed with Honey Bacon BBQ and the brined chickens were a lot more moist and flavorful. I will be using Meat Church Bird Bath brine and Meat Church Honey Bacon BBQ rub, it was the winner 3 among the people that sampled it.

 

Side note: The Meat Church Bird Bath brine is basically a salty Honey Hog if you're interested in trying it.

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Last Thanksgiving I brined and spatchcocked a turkey.  Cutting the back bone out was probably the most difficult part of the process.  I received a gift from Williams and Sonoma of a wet brine mix (Garlic and Rosemary).  Turkey turned out great.  I do use a trick my father-in-law used for all his birds.  I strip of bacon on each leg and a piece of two on each breast.

 

 

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Love the results with spatchcocked turkey. I have done one every year for several years now. My brine is a 1/2 cup orange juice, 1/2 cup fine kosher salt, 1/2 cup wild honey, followed by enough apple cider to cover the bird. I add a bundle of Simon and Garfunkel herbs, and some orange slices. I love cooking turkey at 375, but am not big on smoked turkey. Poultry is just such a smoke sponge, it is easy to over smoke and produce a harsh tasting bird, IMO anyway. If I add any smoke at all it is from a handful of fresh rosemary sprigs thrown on the fire about 20 mins prior to pulling my bird. By the way I have also found that cooking a turkey to George Strait classics produces a better tasting bird. Turkeys must like King George :)

 

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There is a third option.  You can spatchcock the turkey and then close it and cook it whole.  You get all the advantages of spatchcocking and all the extra trimming you can do and still have a bird that presents on the table.  I used a rack to help hold it closed.  Even though it appears closed the exposed back lets in a lot of heat and things cook more quickly and evenly.

 

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