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tkinsley

Brand spankin' new, here

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Hello! Got myself a KJCIII on a whim. Made a pork butt which was amazing. Then... well. Tried to make a beef shoulder roast and it is basically shoe leather. The dogs are happy, though.

Just looking to up my BBQ skills and learn how to use this beautiful beast in all practical ways possible. 

 

Tina

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Welcome to kamado guru Tina.   There is lots of great info here and plenty of great people to answer any question you may have.  Ask away, visit often and post pics of your experiments along the way.

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Glad to have you and your new Joe with us, Tina. Lots of great guys and gals here to give you some tips and show you the way. There is a learning curve, but if most of us here can manage it, believe me so can you. Enjoy your new grill and the forum conversation as well.  You tough beef shoulder could be a result of the cut of meat and how you attempted to cook it.Let us know what you tried and maybe we can give you some tips. Why not try a whole chicken. Cut the backbone out and press it flat, Cook it indirect over a deflector at about 375 until you get an internal temp of 165 in breast. Pre cook Slather it with olive oil and add the rub of your choice. Pretty much a not fail ever cook. 

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21 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Glad to have you and your new Joe with us, Tina. Lots of great guys and gals here to give you some tips and show you the way. There is a learning curve, but if most of us here can manage it, believe me so can you. Enjoy your new grill and the forum conversation as well.  You tough beef shoulder could be a result of the cut of meat and how you attempted to cook it.Let us know what you tried and maybe we can give you some tips. Why not try a whole chicken. Cut the backbone out and press it flat, Cook it indirect over a deflector at about 375 until you get an internal temp of 165 in breast. Slather it with olive oil and add the rub of you choice. Pretty much a not fail ever cook. 

 

It was a shoulder roast--I tried to cook it like the boneless butt low and slow but it just turned into jerky. Tried to hit the same internal temp (205) and clearly this was the wrong move. I have brisket in the freezer but I'm going to wait until I get the hang of this before I try to not ruin a hundred dollars worth of meat!

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4 hours ago, tkinsley said:

 

It was a shoulder roast--I tried to cook it like the boneless butt low and slow but it just turned into jerky. Tried to hit the same internal temp (205) and clearly this was the wrong move. I have brisket in the freezer but I'm going to wait until I get the hang of this before I try to not ruin a hundred dollars worth of meat!

Yeah, that's probably not a cut that lends to good low and slow.  Brisket would do a lot better do to the fat content.  Beef cuts that don't have a lot of intramuscular fat should be low and slowed to an internal temp around 130-140 depending on how rare you like it.  For something like a sirloin or a rump roast low and slow it to desired internal temp then pull and rest it for a few minutes, then give it a really good hot sear either by bringing your grill up to a really hot temp or tossing it in a hot cast iron skillet on the stove.  I use a second grill that I get screaming hot to like 500+ with a cast iron skillet and some butter to sear.

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On 12/1/2019 at 9:33 AM, tkinsley said:

Made a pork butt which was amazing. Then... well. Tried to make a beef shoulder roast and it is basically shoe leather....

That sounds about right. Pork and beef are different. The only problem I see was expectations....

 

I use "cheap beef" like shoulder for a bovine version of pulled pork. Easiest thing in my repertoire, because the beef has no fat to remove, I just cook, chop and sauce - lots of sauce - until it's a nice bbq beef consistency. 

 

Pork butts yield about 2/3 meat, 1/3 fat, in comparison, and get no visible sauce, just a soaking of East Carolina after pulling. 

 

That must be one heck of a brisket... since its frozen, I'll suggest some test cooks? And let's talk about cooking methods, cuts and expectations from low-n-slow cooking. 

 

Doneness

We normally talk about "rare" vs "well done" as internal temperatures in the 125-160F range. That only applies to the tender cuts that get tough and dry as you cook them. No reason you can't smoke these cuts to those temps, but they're also good cooked over high heat; it's the doneness that matters more than the method. 

 

BBQ uses cuts that start off tough, so they're not very good anywhere in the rare-well done range. They need to be "overdone," cooked so the meat breaks down and connective tissue is rendered. This happens at 195-205F internal temperature. The trick is that most cooking methods do bad things to the outside before you get the inside this hot. 

 

Method

There are "hot brisket" cooks out there. I can't speak to them. Mine are low-n-slow, 225-250F for 1.5-2 hrs./lb. and there's an expected process the meat undergoes before it's "done."

1) fast cook - about 50 degrees/hour, you'll hit 160F internal in 2-3 hrs.

2) stall - the meat will take hours to rise to 170F, many hours more than you think

3) slow cook - about 10 degrees/hour, you'll hit 200-205F target in 3-4 hrs. 

4) rest -  slowly cool the meat to 170-140F for serving. Lots of latitude here, usually involves towels and coolers, and service timing. 

 

If you plan to refrigerate for later service, I suggest separating a packer brisket into meat slabs while it's still warm and the fat is soft. I also score the raw brisket through the fat into meat. When cooked, it's real easy to trim or remove the fat squares, depending on the service preference. 

 

And then there's the question of wrapping, and using foil or butcher paper. I wrap loosely in foil for the slow cook, to capture any fluids, then tightly wrap for the rest. Refrigerate that fluid and you can pull a hockey puck of fat off the top of a cup of Jello you'll want to melt back into the meat. It's the secret of brisket; the meat juices gelatinize so they stay in the meat. Warm it up and it's no longer dry. 

 

HAve fun,

Frank

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No Fear! 

This is from a guy who has yet to even cook a frozen pizza on the kamado! 

I am sure your pizza will be great! 

Welcome to the forum! 

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