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Bone-In Pork Loin


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I smoke-roasted this in a Karubecue C-60 stick burner but previous cooks were done in a Cookshack Fast Eddy PG500 pellet pit.  I think it would cook up well in a kamado.  It's the best thing I've ever cooked.

 

I doubled the recipe for a dinner party.

 

 

Ingredients

One bone-in pork loin roast

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

2 teaspoons dried sage leaves

1 teaspoon garlic powder

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Optional Pan Sauce 

¾ cup dry vermouth or white wine

1 cup water

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Instructions

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1.  Trim off unneeded fat and silverskin to expose the meat to the rub.

 

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2.  Rub the roast all over with mustard.  Sprinkle it with the thyme, sage, garlic, salt and pepper, patting so the seasonings will adhere.

 

3.  Put the loin back in the refrigerator for a couple of hours.

4.  Preheat pit to 350° F.

5.  Place the loin in the pit, bones down, until it reaches an internal temperature of 145° to 150° F.

 

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6.  Remove the roast from the oven, place it on a cutting board, tent it with foil, and let it rest for 20 minutes.

 

Meanwhile, if desired, make a pan sauce

7.  Place roasting pan over high heat. 

8.  Add the vermouth and water. 

9.  Bring to a boil, scraping up all the browned bits. 

10.  Continue to boil until reduced by about half.

11.  Slice the pork into chops and serve, drizzling each serving with the pan juices.

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