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Owly

Power Breakfast

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I've never been a fan of so called "breakfast foods".    I live a very active life, so breakfast is important to me, but I consider most things people eat for breakfast little better than garbage!

 

I have several "power breakfasts" I regularly eat, but my current favorite is a sort of green souffle benedict.  Fast and simple.     A hand full  of "power greens", some chopped onion and fresh garlic, some grated cheese, a few cherry tomatoes, one egg and one egg white......... the yoke separated for the sauce, about 2 tsp flour, some salt and about 1/4 t of soda, all go in a single serve blender cup, and are pretty much liqufied.   The works goes into a ramkin that has been greased and floured, and is cooked in the microwave on power3 for about 15 min..... or until firm on top.  While this is going, I have a couple links cooking, and I mix about a T of olive oil or melted butter with with about a t of flour, a pinch of salt and cayenne, and a generous splash of cream or milk, and the egg yoke, which is cooked in a double boiler stirring constantly with a spatula..........  It doesn't take but a couple of minutes if you crank things up.   When It thickens, I throw  in about 1T of lemon juice, and stir until it reaches the consistency I want, then kill the heat and lift the pot out of the boiler.... Once the temp drops, I put it back in to keep it warm.  This is my pseudo hollandaise sauce.    The souffle is removed from the ramkin, and served with the sausages and sauce  for a satisfying and nutritious breakfast.  The result is light and filled with air, not tough and rubbery if done correctly. It rises a bit, but not much, but I've never had one "fall".

      The key  here seems to be the microwave.  I've tried pan fried and baked versions, and the results have not been nearly as satisfying or successful.   I'm tempted to try the sous vide, and probably will, but that will involve at least an hour of cooking, and would have to be done in a pair of those great wide mouth half pint jars greased and floured for release

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Note that I "pioneered" doing this using Sous Vide and half pint jars today..........  176F for 45min......... but they wouldn't need nearly that time........ I was very happy with the result, very tender, and done to perfection.  Far and away the best method I've tried yet.   The beauty of this is that it could be done ahead and just warmed to temp in the jar.   It is also far more controllable than the microwave, or the oven, or airfryer, and vastly superior to skillet cooking.   I'm just starting a 4 day fast (after breakfast today), and I've set several of these in the fridge for "break fast"  (Monday around 10:00).  Next time , I will incorporate precooked bacon or sausage, and perhaps some chunks of mushroom.

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I've taken this a bit further, these days I'm embedding chunks of this and that.... pieces of Wallawalla sweet onions, pieces of cheddar cheese... and other varieties, pieces of bacon, sausage, ham..... Whatever strikes my fancy.   I have a weakness for hollandaise sauce, but it's also good with other things such as ordinary salsa or pico de gallo, or a spicy cheese sauce.   I also sometimes tip the souffle out of the jars, sprinkle it with grated cheese and put it under the broiler.  I get my best results sous vide, at 180 for an hour, it's tender and filled with air, and doesn't fall like an oven baked souffle can do.   I typically split it between two jars.... to give it room to rise.... about half full.

     The real beauty of  this is that I can process salad greens before they go off, which means I can buy the discounted  greens at the  grocery store that have little shelf life left.  I put them in small containers.... about 4oz after running them in the blender with other stuff such as onion, garlic, and Jalapeno, and straining the water off, and freeze the works, blending it with the eggs and a bit of flour, soda, salt,, and grated cheese when ready to use it.   For a single guy like me  living far from the nearest grocery store it means I can buy salad greens in quantity, enjoy them in salads while they are fresh, and when they are about to "go off", process and freeze the remainder.... An excellent economy when the grocery store is 50 miles away.

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