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Kamado_Rich

Brisket Advice For A Beginner

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Ok.  I am planning on doing my first brisket this weekend and I need some advice.  I've been targeting the two YouTube videos for guidance on what to do.

 

Kamado Joe SloROLLER Brisket + Beef Tallow

 

Kamado Joe Brisket 101

 

These differ a bit and I didn't know if one is better than the other.  For reference I have a Kamado Joe Big Joe III with the SloRoller.  So a couple of questions....

 

- The 101 video talks about spraying the brisket with water to help the bark formed, the SloRoller video doesn't mention this.  Is this is step that is optional or not necessary with the SloRoller?  Does it matter?

- Is there a target time/temperature that I should be looking for before I wrap the brisket?  I get the probe test at the end and not worrying about temperature or time as much, but I am trying to understand when to transition?

- With the brisket when it goes to rest is there a time I should target.  I think both videos talk about a couple of hours.  Can it be longer?

 

I'm sure I'll have a few more questions, but that is a good start.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Spritzing is optional in a kamado because the environment is so moist. If you want to, go ahead, but minimize the time the lid is open.

 

Wrapping time ehhhh people have different opinions on it. I do a scratch test: if the bark is formed enough so I can't easily push it away with a fingernail, it's wrappable. Some people go for deep mahogany color to know when it's time. You want a formed bark that's not going to get steamed away. The color will darken in the wrap.

 

You can definitely rest longer if you keep it wrapped in some foil + towel, or foil + towel + cooler, or a warmer if you're lucky enough to have one. Long as it stays over 140F you can hold it for hours. I try to let the product get down to around 175F internal before stowing it to prevent overcooking with carryover heat, and I've held it in foil/towel/cooler for 6 hours, taken it out, and it was still a tad hot to handle.

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9 hours ago, Ogopogo said:

Long as it stays over 140F

 

Just curious about why this temp?

 

thanks

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27 minutes ago, AK-g said:

 

Just curious about why this temp?

 

thanks

 

Food safety. 41-139 is the zone you don't want to hold meats for an extended period of time due to bacterial growth.

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yup, 140 is the upper limit for most of the bad bacteria, above this things get very bad for them, below this (until about 34F) it is PARTY TIME, which leads to bathroom party time for you

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Thanks,

 

I was not sure if it was food safety or something else....rest assured I have never let any food rest for more than an hour :-D

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Nice.  Thanks for the replies.  Super helpful.  :)

 

Another follow up question.  Can you leave a point on and slice that and serve it as fattier pieces and not do burnt ends with it?  I’m assuming it’s a pit master’s (or n00b in my case) choice?

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1 hour ago, Kamado_Rich said:

Nice.  Thanks for the replies.  Super helpful.  :)

 

Another follow up question.  Can you leave a point on and slice that and serve it as fattier pieces and not do burnt ends with it?  I’m assuming it’s a pit master’s (or n00b in my case) choice?

 

It's up to you. I know 3 ways: the Texas style where you leave the point, flat, and fat deckle together and slice against the point grain, the burnt ends style where you separate the point muscle and cube/sauce to make burnt ends obviously, and the way I do it where I separate the point but just so I can slice it separately since I just don't like slicing with the flat grain underneath the point.

 

Here's a good video on slicing Texas style which is what I think you want:

 

 

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Wrapping ribs is not necessary in a Kamado, I assume it is because of the moist environment, so I am wondering if wrapping a brisket is also not so necessary in a Kamado as well?

 

I also have never cooked a brisket.

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14 minutes ago, Rick in Ontario said:

Wrapping ribs is not necessary in a Kamado, I assume it is because of the moist environment, so I am wondering if wrapping a brisket is also not so necessary in a Kamado as well?

Its not necessary, no, I usually don't, but wrapping also decreases the cooking time dramatically, because youre able to overcome the stall that much faster.

I have had small flats take 16 hours to cook unwrapped, and I have had full packer briskets take less than 16, because I wrapped them.

 

I don't do ribs often, because my wife does not eat pork, but when I do, i never wrap them, or do any of the 3-2-1 stuff you'll see around, I just throw them on at 250ish until theyre done. Easy, tasty, no fuss

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15 hours ago, KJTerp said:

 

I don't do ribs often, because my wife does not eat pork, but when I do, i never wrap them, or do any of the 3-2-1 stuff you'll see around, I just throw them on at 250ish until theyre done. Easy, tasty, no fuss

This! 

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I don't necessarily believe one way is better than another, I think it's a matter of personal preference on spritzing and wrapping. I've watched some videos, listened to some podcasts and read various articles on the subject. Some are for it and some suggest it's not needed. I've experimented with both and my preference is to spritz on a long cook like a beef or pork. As for wrapping... as soon as I get to the stall I pull the meat and wrap it. I wrap it as tight as I can and then back onto the Akron, beef gets wrapped in paper and pork in aluminum foil. At that point it takes as long as it takes. I try to anticipate the overall cook time by starting backwards from what time I plan to serve by calculating in 1-2 hours rest in a dry cooler and reaching target temp at completion. Aaron Franklin teaches this in MasterClass and it makes total sense. Anyway Rich, best of luck in your first brisket. There's a lot of experienced cooks in this forum that are open to sharing information so just know if you're not sure of something during your cook, you can always come here for suggestions and advice.

 

Mike

 

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@Team402 any good markers I should be looking for to know when the meat gets to the stall?  I think I’m leaning towards wrapping it when it gets to that point, but not sure what that point is necessarily.  Does the temp level off? Is it the bark forming or tenderness of the meat?  

 

Thanks @Rick in Ontario, I’ll give that video a look today as well.  

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