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Kamado_Rich

Brisket Advice For A Beginner

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On 2/5/2020 at 7:44 AM, KJTerp said:

I don't do ribs often, because my wife does not eat pork, but when I do, i never wrap them, or do any of the 3-2-1 stuff you'll see around, I just throw them on at 250ish until theyre done. Easy, tasty, no fuss

3-2-1 and you're over done.  Did two racks that way once, never again.  Every time I do them unwrapped, they are so freaking good.

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47 minutes ago, Kamado_Rich said:

@Team402 any good markers I should be looking for to know when the meat gets to the stall?  I think I’m leaning towards wrapping it when it gets to that point, but not sure what that point is necessarily.  Does the temp level off? Is it the bark forming or tenderness of the meat?  

 

Thanks @Rick in Ontario, I’ll give that video a look today as well.  

 

The stall is whenever the temp levels off or dips due to evaporative cooling. It can be hard to tell; if your temp is high enough you might not even notice it, sometimes it happens at different temps just because of variability in the meat, and sometimes I've had two stalls. That's why I wrap based on whether or not the bark is formed rather than where I think the stall is.

 

If you're set on using the stall as a wrap time guide, watch for whenever the internal temp of the meat stops rising for an extended period. If it doesn't rise for an hour, chances are good you're in the stall.

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4 minutes ago, Ogopogo said:

 

The stall is whenever the temp levels off or dips due to evaporative cooling. It can be hard to tell; if your temp is high enough you might not even notice it, sometimes it happens at different temps just because of variability in the meat, and sometimes I've had two stalls. That's why I wrap based on whether or not the bark is formed rather than where I think the stall is.

 

If you're set on using the stall as a wrap time guide, watch for whenever the internal temp of the meat stops rising for an extended period. If it doesn't rise for an hour, chances are good you're in the stall.

Interesting.  I think that makes sense.  I like the idea of watching the bark.  Thanks again.

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@Kamado_Rich

 

Brisket is a challenge for beginners.  If you want MY personal suggestion for your first brisket, have a look at this one:

 

 

 

This one is nearly foolproof in terms of meat tenderness.  It's NOT a competition style brisket.  This is still one of my favorite ways to cook beef brisket.  I have made a lot of videos that show different techniques.  All of them work and all of them produce good results.  The MOST DIFFICULT part for beginners on brisket is being able to tell when it's done.  If your brisket ends up dry or tough in any way, it could be under or over cooked.  

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5 hours ago, Kamado_Rich said:

@Team402 any good markers I should be looking for to know when the meat gets to the stall?  I think I’m leaning towards wrapping it when it gets to that point, but not sure what that point is necessarily.  Does the temp level off? Is it the bark forming or tenderness of the meat?  

 

Thanks @Rick in Ontario, I’ll give that video a look today as well.  

 

Well, as Ogopogo stated there really isn't a set temp as to when the stall will occur. It occurs when the temps in your meat stop steadily rising over an extended period of time. There are a number of variables that play into when the stall happens. However, I've noticed in my cooks that it usually happens between 165-185. Right about the time I start seeing mid 160s I will start paying closer attention to the temps and the intervals at which the temps change. If after about a half hour the temp hasn't moved I'll let it go another roughly 15 mins and recheck. At that point I will know if I'm there or not based on what the number currently is vs what it was. Hopefully this is starting to make some sense to you. 

 

Mike

 

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So as in line with my personality, I didn't follow @John Setzler's advice and I'm going for glory or going down in flame with my first brisket.  Here is a link to my Flame Boss cook which is in progress on 2/23/20.  Some pics of progress are below.  The Grill is at 250 and holding steady.  I was expecting a stall somewhere between 160-170, but it seems to be plowing through.  The bark is about 80% formed except for the top (which you can see from the pic below).  I'm spritzing the bark that is formed while the rest finishes.  As I'm writing this I've been going for about 6.5 hours and the meat temp is about 175.  The cut was a full packer and just shy of 17 pounds before I trimmed about 3.5 pounds off of it, including cutting the corner at a 90 degree angle against the grain.

 

I'm still trying to decide to wrap this bad boy or not.  I don't want it to dry out, but I also don't want it to finish super early either.  I was expected about a 13 hour cook (about an hour a pound).  Oh well.  We will see how this keeps going.  Going to check it at the 7 hour mark and go from there.  

 

Any thoughts are appreciated.

 

 

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https://myflameboss.com/en/cooks/814539
 

I wrapped in foil at 8 hours in. Barked seemed pretty well formed. I would rather target a moist brisket than anything I put a little apple cider vinegar and apple juice in with the meat. Maybe a couple of ounces with spritzing. Pic below of right before I wrapped. 

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Ok so after about a little over 11 hours I pulled this bad boy off and it was probe tender.  Glad I wrapped it in foil.  Texas crutch or not, I needed it. Here is the link to the cook one more time if anyone is interested. 

 

Pulled her off just over 11 hours and have it double wrapped it foil and resting in the cooler wrapped in towels.  Likely to let it rest for about 3 hours.  I'll post one more set of pics when I cut it.

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Looks good especially for your first cook on a kamado. I did a bunch of burgers and chicken legs then did a packer as soon as I thought I could hold temps so I can relate.

 

Is that rosemary in the rub?

 

11 hours is very fast for a 17 pounder at 250F but I've had similar cooks sometimes.

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I was surprised at the time as well. The verdict is I wished I would have wrapped earlier. The ends were over done but the middle, especially around the deckle was pretty damn good if I do say so myself. Seemed like people liked it. Definitely room for improvement, but happy for my first go round. Check out the smoke ring!

 

@Ogopogothe rub was the Man Cave Meals Beef Mojo rub. Had a nice little kick to it.  I think it was rosemary though!

 

 

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