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Reverse seared tomahawk

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6 hours ago, Vanole said:

If given the opportunity I could make short work of that for you...

It looks grrrrrrrrrrreat!

Thanks!!! I ended up reheating it for the family later that night. I was too full of scotch lmao

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Thank you for posting that video. Your steak looked great and I'm sure it ended up being phenomenal. What I particularly liked is the way you added in your genuine sense of humor into the video. In my opinion, that's what made the video. A guy hanging out in his backyard, cooking some food, getting f*&$#ed up and being completely normal. Well done!

 

Mike

  

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That's one real nice-looking steak Glen! Really nice photos and your video is as entertaining as always. Now I'm in the mood for steak and scotch.:P

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Single malt Scotch whisky is the way to go, IMO. Blended is never one thing or the other, never really distinctive or memorable. And at the prices for premium whisky these days it better be memorable...at least. . The Ardbeg Araigh nam Beist pictured above was a birthday present from a client and was one of the finest, smoothest most delicious drams I have ever tasted. Unfortunately, it is near-as-nevermind impossible to find anymore.

 

I like the Island malts--Laphroaig, Lagavulin, Ardbeg, etc. But they are almost an acquired taste, being heavy on 'peat reek' (smoke). But very few distilleries in Scotland still make whisky the way it was once done, and as a consequence that distinctive smoke character (that virtually defines Scotch)  is all but non-existent in Lowland and Speyside malts....even Highland malts are lacking. Only the Island malts still make whisky the old, Traditional way (over open peat fires)  and for many...esp. neophytes... the 'iodine', from the kelp in the island peat bogs, is  too much.

 

Most people looking to get into single malts are better off starting with Glenlivet or Craggenmore or (if feeling flush) Macallan (the 18 is a joy) or at best Glenmorangie. Each one has a distinctive taste from caramel to raisins to flowers ...yet none of them 'sweet' the way an Irish or a bourbon might be.

 

Then too, anything younger than 12 years old tends to be a little too 'hot' for the more sophisticated palates much less the  novice palate.

 

And, FWIW, it is worth noting that most Scots and every single malt Scotch whiskey aficionado int the world will tell you that drinking Scotch on ice ruins the natural, intended flavour. But that adding a wee bit of water (preferentially distilled or from the same spring that the whiskey was made from) 'opens' the taste and aroma.

 

My all tyme favourite, ever-day single malt is Highland Park 12 but the 15 is very smooth. It's an island malt but not as robust as the the others. Highland Park owns their own beat bogs and expect to be drawing from it for the next 300 years.

 

YMMV

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