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spatchcock chicken question


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I do all my chicken (either parts, whole/spatched etc) over a foil drip pan (I hate burned chicken fat taste), and at no less than 425-450....always turns out great.

 

Alternatively, I do it IN a cast iron pan (either in the oven or kamado) at 450ish.  Pan sauce from the drippings is amazing.

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Yeah, I always use a drip pan with chicken, turkey, duck, etc. However, your drip pan can easily do double duty and provide you with a flavorful side dish as well. I usually start chicken at 375 and then let the temp climb to 425. Usually takes a little more than an hour depending on the size of the bird. Chicken is pretty much "fool proof" and an  easy cook that delivers comfort food flavor. In my book, you haven't really had good chicken until you had it cooked on a Kamado. Hint: if you like crispy skin, let your chicken set uncovered in the fridge for 2 hours or so, after you have spatchcocked it, before your cook. 

 

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2 hours ago, Family_cook said:

This recipe really is almost fail proof.  Works better in a Kamado than an oven. https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/no-fail-roast-chicken-with-lemon-and-garlic

I have done that exact cook, although I didn't have that detailed recipe. I can attest to the fact it turns out a wonderful tasting roast chicken. I threw about 12 asparagus spears into the pan with about 20 minutes left to hit the target temp. Turned out great and was a really fun cook. I used a 13" double handled lodge pan instead of a long handled skillet. Fits better in your kamado. I brought the finished cook to the table in the pan, setting it in the center of the table with everyone seated. I carved it right in the pan. Makes for a great party presentation, lots of oooh's and ahhhhh's.

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6 hours ago, SmallBBQr said:

I do all my chicken (either parts, whole/spatched etc) over a foil drip pan (I hate burned chicken fat taste), and at no less than 425-450....always turns out great.

 

There's mixed opinion on the advisability of letting fowl drip directly onto the coals...

These cooking discussions are always interesting to me.

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I completely agree.  I think a lot depends on the TYPE of fire, the temp, etc. etc....though I know not the specifics of what makes it taste good, vs what makes it taste acrid/burnt.  There is that "flare up" which seems to spread amazing flavour, and the kind that just tastes bad...

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I want to try out a purchased brine and cook the spatchcocked chicken in a 12" lodge pan using the recipe above but don't know if I should brine the chicken before I spatchcock or after?

 

On 3/30/2020 at 1:12 PM, keeperovdeflame said:

Hint: if you like crispy skin, let your chicken set uncovered in the fridge for 2 hours or so, after you have spatchcocked it, before your cook. 

 

I am planning to brine in the refrigerator overnight and will make time to let any seasoning sit on the bird for whatever absorption will happen before cooking. From the quote above I know to remove the bird from the brine and dry it. Do I need to rinse with water and dry or can I just dry the brine before seasoning?  I don't want to make it too complicated but my CIA-trained wife (Culinary Institute of America) is highly skeptical of any meal she doesn't prepare, so I'd like to do it right and get some street cred. Thanks in advance.

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7 hours ago, Old Aviator said:

I want to try out a purchased brine and cook the spatchcocked chicken in a 12" lodge pan using the recipe above but don't know if I should brine the chicken before I spatchcock or after?

I am planning to brine in the refrigerator overnight and will make time to let any seasoning sit on the bird for whatever absorption will happen before cooking. From the quote above I know to remove the bird from the brine and dry it. Do I need to rinse with water and dry or can I just dry the brine before seasoning? 

I Don't usually brine chickens, but do brine my Thanksgiving turkeys. I would spatchcock the chicken first  and then brine it. Don't wash it off after the brine just let it sit uncovered in a baking dish in the fridge.  It is important to keep it cold and below 40 degrees during the entire brining and fridge air drying processes. Enjoy your cook, this is a good one to help you rack up some street cred stars. Happy cooking. 

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1 hour ago, Old Aviator said:

Thank you, Sir.

You know, after some thought and rereading your post, I had second thoughts about the washing off the brine. I use a mixture of apple cider, orange juice, honey, and kosher salt and just leave the brine on the bird. However, you stated your using a purchased brine. If it is one of those salad dressing types of brine, with oil and such, I would wash it off. Sorry for the walk back, originally I was only thinking in terms of my brine. 

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Thank you very much. I'll check the ingredients but I know it isn't a salad dressing type and I'm pretty sure it doesn't have oil. I remember when marinading in Italian Dressing and cooking over briquettes was the real deal, but those days are gone.

 

Incidentally, I grew up in Phoenix until I was in the 8th grade, when my dad got transferred and my family moved to Virginia.

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