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I’ve cooked a few, never got the desired result, too dry, too tough, flavor not up to expectations, etc. I’d given up on the cut,  decided  all the glowing descriptions I’d read were a bunch of hooey and vowed I’d never get sucked into buying one again. Then along came the coronavirus and I found my choices of what to buy became, how shall I say this, somewhat limited, as in: Would you like this last tri tip, or . . .nothing?

So, I bought it, a “Mortons of Omaha” marinated tri tip, It’s 4 pounds of (potentially) beefy goodness, and, as I write this, it is defrosting on my kitchen counter. I’m looking for suggestions on how to cook it on the kamado from any tri tip experts/aficionados on the forum. Temperature? Direct or indirect? Smoke wood? Inject with beef broth? Tricks and tips? Clue me in, please, and I promise to post again and let you know how it came out, and I’ll even post a picture or two.

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Here is a fantastic recipe for Grilled Espresso Tri-Tip Roast. I have only cooked this on a Weber around 350, but it comes out looking just like the photo. No need to sear at all, just cook indirect. I prefer cooking to 120 and letting carryover bring it to medium rare.

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/grilled-espresso-tri-tip-roast-333805

 

I have found the texture of the pre-marinated tri-tips to be not to my liking. I wonder what it would be like to cook a tri-tip like a brisket low and slow...

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So I watched a bunch of YouTube videos and decided, being basically a lazy guy, to cook it indirect. Used a couple of chunks of oak for smoke. So here it is going on the grill, off the grill, sliced and on the plate.

it was tasty, tender and not dry, although I’ve got to say it didn’t look like any of the tri tips I saw on YouTube, no tail at all. I got it at Aldi, so maybe it was the German version of a tri tip.

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Forgot to mention, cook time was about an hour at 325 F for a 4 lb. roast. Internal temp was between 140-145 F, depending on where I poked it. Pretty economical as well, $4/lb and it fed 3 adults and 2 kids with plenty leftover for another meal for me and Mrs. Dent.

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Looks good. But as you say, it doesn’t quite have the tritip look. If it tastes good, who cares.  I do mine like a steak. Blazing hot.. 90 secs, turn 90*..... 90 sec.... Flip... 90 sec.... Turn 90*... Close down all vents.... Cook until desired doneness. Make sure you open both vents, before you open the lid, or you’ll get a big flashback. Be careful... Oh...Only garlic powder, salt and pepper. 
Butch

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15 hours ago, Family_cook said:

Yep,  that looks like a tri-tip cooked indirect at @325.  Next time try the excellent advice given above.

Direct would work for an real tri tip, as a real tri tip would be much thinner. Although I’ve tried to cook them direct, and was not happy with the results, as outlined above. This piece of meat was too thick to cook direct.  By the time the inside got to medium rare temperature, the outside would have been way overcooked. So I cooked it indirect and got a very good result.

 

Just an aside though- Why the snarkey comment? Got the coronavirus confinement blues? Doesn’t do anyone, except perhaps you, making you feel bigger than you actually are, any good to post comments with that tone. I can understand it on a political or current issues forum, but it is out of place here.

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Not sure how you read my comment as snarky, but if you saw it that way you have my apology.  The title of your post was "help me out".  You indicated you took the lazy way.  I was only suggesting you try the advice given for a different result. 

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Arthur,

 

I just happened to open and read this thread and since I'm an avid loving of Trip-Tip I thought I'd weight in.

 

1. Let me start off by saying that I'm not trying to come off as criticizing you or your method of cooking it.

 

2. The German version of Tri-Tip doesn't look like a Tri-Tip as we know them here in SoCal. (see the pics below for what they should look like) Tri-Tip was a cut of meat that started out here in Santa Maria California. That makes it somewhat of a regional cut of meat that isn't always available in every other region.

 

3. Since what you had wasn't really Tri-Tip, you shouldn't judge what it's like based on your results.

 

Having said the above let me post the way I cook them. If you can get a real Tri-Tip, I'd think you can cook it this way and get the good results I usually get.

 

Tri-Tip - My Way

I’ve cooked a Tri-Tip many times. This is the way I do them and they turn out great every time. Here are the ingredients:

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I smear on some Worcestershire sauce, then some fresh ground salt, fresh ground black pepper, some steak seasoning and finally some fresh minced rosemary from my garden.

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Wrap it up for an 8 hour rest in the fridge. Shortly before the 8 hours are up I prep my kamado for 2 zone cooking and lite it up. After taking the Tri-Tip out of the fridge, I put a couple of Pecan chunks on the charcoal and placed the Tri-Tip on the indirect side. (Kamado temp should be approx. 275-300)

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Here it is after the Maverick says the I.T. is 112 to 113. (No more than 115)

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I take it off and loosely tent it with foil and open up the vents for searing. Once the thermometer reads at least 500 degrees (more like 650 on the grate) I place it on for 3 a sear minute sear.   Here’s a pic without the flash.

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After 3 minutes I flip it and took this pic with the flash.

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Bring it inside and let it rest for 10 minutes.

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I then cut it in half along the seam so I could cut it against the grain. (See the way the grain is running?)

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Sliced

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And that’s Money!

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Thanks for looking.

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Oh and another thing to know. It's important to crave the Tri-Tip properly for the best results. Tri-Tip can be slightly tricky as the gain changes direction. Here is a You Tube video that explains it better than I ever could.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmxHmuV4vTU

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OK I guess I should read the entire thread before responding. I now see where you said you didn't get a normal looking Tri-Tip. Sorry for pointing out something you already knew. :oops:

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1 hour ago, DerHusker said:

Oh and another thing to know. It's important to crave the Tri-Tip properly for the best results. Tri-Tip can be slightly tricky as the gain changes direction. Here is a You Tube video that explains it better than I ever could.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmxHmuV4vTU

Nice visual...

Butch

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