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Brisket mishap


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Well, the time came for me to give a brisket a go, for the 1st time on my KJBJIII. It was a bust. I had my Kamado at an average of 215 almost all the way through. Ended up being on there for 23 hours. I was watching the temp in the flat and it got to around 190. Some parts in the point were sitting around there and 200 +. I took the point off and made burnt ends. Those were great. When I went to slice the brisket, after it had been wrapped and rested for an hour, it wouldn't slice easy at all and just crumbled and was dry.

 

I felt like the probe test was good at some points and others were not quite there. If i had gone with my gut, I would have pulled it off, around 18 to 20 hours.

 

Any constructive criticism is gladly accepted.

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14 minutes ago, len440 said:

How large was the brisket ? Did you use the deflector plates? 215 is that the grate or dome temp? I don't know much about briskets but the info might help others.

14 lbs

I used the SloRoller

Grate and dome were within 5 degrees

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OK Dave, brilliant brisket is not rocket science... just don't overthink it!

My wife and I did a roll-on-the-floor brisket this weekend... it was amazing!

Despite all that you have read, low-and-slow vs fast-burn really doesn't matter...  it's all about the long, slow rest.

Get your brisket to 10 degrees below the desired end temp...

(So if you want 205°, pull at 195°)

Wrap that baby in towels and place it in a cooler for at least 4 hours... the long slow rest makes all the difference.

Doesn't matter whether you get to 195° via 225° or 275°  just get there and pull it and do the long slow rest.

I'm telling you this is the secret!

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On 4/27/2020 at 11:04 AM, Dave Bradfute said:

... It was a bust. I had my Kamado at an average of 215 almost all the way through. Ended up being on there for 23 hours. ...

I got a similar result on my last brisket. My problem was that I ran the Kamado too cool. My set-point for decades has been 250F on the exit vent. Worked for the stick-burner, works for Kamado. Last time, I ran mine lower, at 225-235F, so it took too long to cook, and dried out. 

 

Cook a little hotter, so you're done sooner, and see what you get! Also, cook until it's done; low-n-slow has zero carryover. I only see the effect in high-temp/short duration cooking.  

 

Stay well,

Frank

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I have some friends that swear that, when you are cooking a large piece of meat, you should wrap it loosely in aluminum foil.  Remove the foil only about an hour before it's reached temperature to let the smoke hit the outer skin.  Pull it off 20º below the desired temperature, rewrap it in foil and let it rest.  They suggest making several deep knife cuts to the core of the meat.  They also swear by the importance of brining.  I personally haven't cooked "large meat" on my grill so I don't know if it's true or not.

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10 hours ago, TJGman said:

OK Dave, brilliant brisket is not rocket science... just don't overthink it!

My wife and I did a roll-on-the-floor brisket this weekend... it was amazing!

Despite all that you have read, low-and-slow vs fast-burn really doesn't matter...  it's all about the long, slow rest.

Get your brisket to 10 degrees below the desired end temp...

(So if you want 205°, pull at 195°)

Wrap that baby in towels and place it in a cooler for at least 4 hours... the long slow rest makes all the difference.

Doesn't matter whether you get to 195° via 225° or 275°  just get there and pull it and do the long slow rest.

I'm telling you this is the secret!

Thanks for that! This will be my next approach.

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I just did my first brisket (17 lb Prime) and kept the grill temp (not dome temp) between 240 and 275 for 9 hours.  Wrapped in foil at 170 and took off foil at 195.  No hard bark.  The foil had kept it too moist.  Removed foil and took to 205 in the flat.  The point was always hotter than the flat.  Removed and wrapped in foil for 1 hour.  Everybody was pleased.  Had a hard time maintaining temp but have since figured out to use more charcoal.

 

Just got some butcher paper.  Was not pleased with foil this time.

 

Maybe go hotter next time.

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Potato rolls are readily available here, several brands.

 

Here is an interesting story. Years ago, when I first got the Charlottesville territory, I discovered a coffee shop called Spud Nuts. Potato donuts.

 

turns out they were originally a franchise. I looked them up on the inter web. I think a franchise was @ $25. Got the equipment and a bag of potato flour.

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I am not a fan of the powder brisket, myself and I'm going to go out on a limb and say it isn't always the same temperature in my experience.  I always cook to probe tender.  Now to get the most consistent results, my go to method is this.  (no one will agree with me, but this is for my tastes).  Trim and heavily season the night before you plan on cooking.  I like to keep it simple about and even split of kosher salt and media grind black pepper, with a little garlic powder and maybe cayenne on there.  Have your kamado ready and heat soaked in the morning with a few chunks of wood (pecan is my preferred wood) at about 225.  2 Hours fat cap up, flip 2 hours far cap down, wrap in butcher paper for 4 hours.  Of course that last time is +/- 30 minutes, you just want it to probe tender everywhere.  This method gives me very consistent timing, whereas other methods the timing is all over the place, and I get unfinished parts and some over cooked and crumbly with other methods.  This will not get you the crusty bark some people like.  To me, that is not the most important part of brisket.  Others will disagree with me. 

Oh, I also do a fairly long rest afterwards. 

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On 5/1/2020 at 9:16 PM, JohnnyAppetizer said:

Potato rolls are readily available here, several brands.

 

Here is an interesting story. Years ago, when I first got the Charlottesville territory, I discovered a coffee shop called Spud Nuts. Potato donuts.

 

turns out they were originally a franchise. I looked them up on the inter web. I think a franchise was @ $25. Got the equipment and a bag of potato flour.

 

We still have a donut shop called Tatonut. Made with potato flower. It was a franchise forty plus years ago. I thought the franchise had the same name, but who knows. It's been privately owned forever. 

Robert Mohler owned it. He was an entrepreneur. He and his wife, Nonie, had seven sons! Mostly monsters! He had to have been one of the toughest hombres out there just wrangling those guys. One of his sons, Camp, still runs it. 

I do know they're great donuts! Saturdays used to have folks lined up down the block by seven AM! I haven't checked to see if they're open during the China flu. 

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