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Pork Roll w/asparagus and brussel sprouts

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This was an outstanding meal and pretty easy to cook.  The veggies cooked in a foil pack with a little pork rub and olive oil.  The loin cooked indirect at 300°f for about 90 minutes and was pulled at an internal temperature of 148°f.

 

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I cut this open, dusted with some pork rub, cream cheese and fresh spinach out of our garden. 

 

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Tied it up nice and tight and put in in the preheated Primo.

 

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Just about ready!

 

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Yum, the spinach was juicy and the cheese creamy.

 

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The sprouts and asparagus steamed perfectly in their own juices and complimented the pork very well.

 

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Had to have something refreshing to finish this meal with!

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Looks wonderful! That just looks so amazingly good with the fresh spinach!

What cut did you start with for the pork roll? Did you butterfly a loin?

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1 hour ago, O C said:

Looks wonderful! That just looks so amazingly good with the fresh spinach!

What cut did you start with for the pork roll? Did you butterfly a loin?

 

It was a section of a whole loin I had, yes, I just kinda cut a large flat piece out of it, put the rub, cream cheese and spinach on it and then rolled it back up tight.  Tied it pretty tight on the ends first (so the stuffing stayed inside) and finally the middle to help keep it together.  After the cook the integrity of the cut was excellent. 

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Great looking pork roll Hope theirs some tequila in the green drink. As a side note i miss Roger the doger. Now on to the next entry

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