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I'm hooked on Chuck roast


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I went down to my local butcher for the first time ever (just a few miles down the road) and had them cut me a 4.5lb roast while I waited. And it came out fantastic. I got to use the TipTopTemp ok this cook, but the next one will be done using a BBQube.  I think I'm going to have to invest in buying from this place in bulk.

 

 

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On this cook I: 

 

  • The night before, apply the rub and wrap in cling wrap.  Let it sit in the fridge until you need to cook it.
  • I'm using lump charcoal and make a volcano shaped mound.   
  • I've been rebuilding my front banister and have leftover cuts of 1x1 slats hanging about.  I just stick one leftover dead center of the bottom grate and pile the charcoal around it.
  • For the last two cooks I've used large chunks of hickory wood.  I have NOT soaked it.  This time I put in about 8 pieces at various places on the bottom layer of charcoal since I knew it'd be a longer cook.
  • I soaked two cotton balls in hand sanitizer.... or at least that's what the squeeze bottle says.  It's almost paint stripper, so it is.  And I placed them into the void my 1x1 slat left behind.
  • I busted out the map gas torch and set the cotton ablaze.  I left the lid and all vents open fully for about 5 minutes.
  • After I was sure that things were rolling along pretty well I put in my heat diffuser and main grate with temperature probe attached.
  • Once it hit 150F I put the TipTopTemp on to the top vent and set the bottom vent to what amounts to "1" on the Akorn.  I let that settle down a bit and moved it to just barely allowing air in through the bottom vent over the course of 30 minutes.
  • Once it stayed steady around 260F I pulled the meat from the fridge, put in my temp probe, and put the chuck into the Akorn.
  • For the first two hours I sprayed the meat down with a spritz of water.  It hit 160 by the third hour so it didn't need any more shots
  • IF I had butcher paper, I would have used it for this step.  I do not yet have any.  I pulled the meat at 160 and wrapped it up in aluminum foil and put my probe back in place.  This went back into the grill.  IF you have butcher paper it should help preserve the bark better.
  • Once it hit 200F I pulled the meat and placed it, and several towels, into a smaller igloo cooler that we have kicking around.  
  • Total time to this point was between 5.5 and 6 hours.
  • I left it in the cooler in my closed off laundry room (which was running laundry at the time and warmer than the rest of the house) for 2 hours.
  • Pulled it out about 5PM, sliced it, and shared it with the spouse and a neighbor up the street.

 

For the most part it floated around 240 and 270F for the entirety of cook.  Which, given that I started at 50F ambient temps and ended at nearly 70F, seems reasonable.  It tastes just as good as the BBQ I've had out recently so I call it a win.

 

The rub was pretty simple and pulled from recipe site or another.  It's a little bit spicy?  I mean, so long as you get some bark, you can tell it has some bite.  You can make your own with:

  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon oregano (skipped because I didn't have any in the house)
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
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13 hours ago, Ophbalance said:

On this cook I: 

 

  • The night before, apply the rub and wrap in cling wrap.  Let it sit in the fridge until you need to cook it.
  • I'm using lump charcoal and make a volcano shaped mound.   
  • I've been rebuilding my front banister and have leftover cuts of 1x1 slats hanging about.  I just stick one leftover dead center of the bottom grate and pile the charcoal around it.
  • For the last two cooks I've used large chunks of hickory wood.  I have NOT soaked it.  This time I put in about 8 pieces at various places on the bottom layer of charcoal since I knew it'd be a longer cook.
  • I soaked two cotton balls in hand sanitizer.... or at least that's what the squeeze bottle says.  It's almost paint stripper, so it is.  And I placed them into the void my 1x1 slat left behind.
  • I busted out the map gas torch and set the cotton ablaze.  I left the lid and all vents open fully for about 5 minutes.
  • After I was sure that things were rolling along pretty well I put in my heat diffuser and main grate with temperature probe attached.
  • Once it hit 150F I put the TipTopTemp on to the top vent and set the bottom vent to what amounts to "1" on the Akorn.  I let that settle down a bit and moved it to just barely allowing air in through the bottom vent over the course of 30 minutes.
  • Once it stayed steady around 260F I pulled the meat from the fridge, put in my temp probe, and put the chuck into the Akorn.

First, thanks for the details! 

Sometimes interesting cooks are accompanied by few specifics. I'd say your description answers most questions about the cook. 

Second, your bio says other kamado. You clearly use an Akorn, do you have "other kamados"? 

Just curious, no big deal. 

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Thanks!  Nope, I just missed the option when setting up my profile.  Not sure how, but I only have the Akorn for now.  It wouldn't shock me that over the next few years that I don't start accumulating other outdoor cookers as well ;).

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1 hour ago, Ophbalance said:

It wouldn't shock me that over the next few years that I don't start accumulating other outdoor cookers as well ;).

 

Tread softly: the expertise and cooking experiences of the people on this Forum will prove to be a strong influence on you and may lead you down the very road of temptation of which you speak.

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19 hours ago, Old Aviator said:

 

Tread softly: the expertise and cooking experiences of the people on this Forum will prove to be a strong influence on you and may lead you down the very road of temptation of which you speak.

 

I tend to... uh... dive in head first into hobbies.  My 3D printers have already multiplied, and so have the motorcycles.  I don't see any reason why the grills won't follow suit ;).  But at least they're (mostly) productive hobbies!

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2 hours ago, len440 said:

I know about hobbies my other one is rc airplanes ( since 1980) talk about a money sucker.

 

We had many many RC planes when I was growing up.  That is, until a flood wiped out ALL the electronics for it in 93.  My father lost every piece of kit that we had and threw in the towel at that point.  But this was back in the balsa wood only days with monocoat.  Anymore you can build everything out of foam and trash it for next to nothing.  The TX/RX will still run you an arm and a leg, but it's easier to get into.  Unless you do FPV flying.  At which point you might as well get a second mortgage to pay for it.  Motorcycles and 3D printing are far cheaper and safer on my wallet ;).

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