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Kozik

Weber kettle vs Kamado

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Sorry to start this thread as I know it’s been discussed 1000x but I think I’m coming at it from a slightly different angle...

 

so I have a Weber kettle with a slow n sear, pizza attachment and a flame boss 400. So I have no problems holding low stable temperature for smoking, I can hit 800F to do pizza and two zone cooking is I mean the kettles bread and butter. 
 

most arguments I see for the Kamado’s is the temp stability but I mean the flame boss already handles it for me So I don’t see the benefit there. Another is the ability for high temp but I mean I can sear no problem on the kettle and I don’t see any situation I would need a consistent 700F+ dome temp other than pizza which again with the pizza kettle isn’t an issue. 
 

the only benefit I can think of that I don’t have covered is fuel cost, the Weber kettle burns more charcoal for the same temps but is it really that much more to justify the Kamado? 
 

I mean in accessories I’m just short the cost of something like a pit boss or vision Kamado so I get my situation is unique, sort of.

 

reason I’m bringing this up is there is a decent sale on a Kamado Joe classic and I always thought I’d upgrade to a Kamado one day but even at the sale price I’m struggling to justify the cost with my current setup being what it is...

 

is there anything else I’m missing that could justify the Kamado?

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If you want to do super long cooks the kamado would be great for that. Ive done several 24 hr cooks at 190-200 degrees. W/ charcoal to spare at the end. I think you should get it if you think youll enjoy cooking on it. And that alone is reason enough to go for it. 

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You are pretty much the only one that can decide if it justifies the cost of going to a ceramic cooker.  I cooked on Weber kettles, 4 of em in 40 years and didn't regret one of them.  I coulda stretched the life of them by replacing movable parts but I had to face the facts, I wanted a KJ so I bit the bullet and bought 2 of them.  Like the Webers, I don't regret getting the KJs either.  Good luck

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Look at all the differences. There may be things you haven't considered. 

The kamado will take longer to bring up to temp. That could put you off if you don't expect it. 

A ceramic will certainly be more durable. 

Kamados just aren't for everyone. My son-in-law has a big, trailer towed stick burner. He got a kamado and returned it. It was mostly because of the difficulty in tending the fire. Folks on the forum know it's rarely necessary, but he couldn't get comfortable being unable to easily interact directly with the lump. 

I am just saying consider all the differences. 

Having said that, GO FOR IT! 

it's fun! If you don't like it, I imagine you can unload it for little loss. 

Good Luck! 

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I use three.

For quick and simple, I use propane

For steaks I prefer my kettle & charcoal briquets

For low and slow and most bigger things its the kamado.  I've never done pizza and the like on it [yet?]

 

When it came to a go or no-go on buying a kamado I wasn't sure I'd like it and an expensive big name version seemed like a costly experiment.   Along came the Akorn.  At only $300 or so I tried it.  So far I love it and see no reason to get anything "better".  It may not last as long as some others but I figure I can replace it many times [every 7 or 8 years -?-  if left in weather, estimates vary a lot] if it rusts out for the same cost as one of the better known brands.  We don't get enough rain to rust anything so it is likely to last longer.

 

Learning how to regulate temps doesn't take long.  Fuel use is ridiculously minimal.  A full load of lump is less than half a bag and I can get maybe a half dozen rib cooks from that.

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I have 8 Weber's six are charcoal and two are gas, but I love my Kamado Joe Jr and I'm thinking about a classic to add to the family! So get one and keep your kettle they go together like PB&J!

 

Scott

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The only down side of a Kamado joe is  cost, weight (if you have to move often) , warm up time  and accessories are pricey. On the plus side it could be the last grill you buy. It   doubles as a grill. oven and smoker. The smoke flavor will be different than a offset stick and a gas smoke, but tasty.It's easy to use and will run at any temp you want for a long time, you can also turn off the charcoal. 

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Here's what I think – "these are two entirely-different styles of cooking appliances!"

 

A "simple charcoal kettle" – Weber or otherwise – is a "direct-heating device."  The burning charcoal is sitting there, and it's doing all the work."

 

Whereas, a Kamado-style appliance is – or, can be – "a convection oven!"  Within a space wherein both the entry and the exit of air can be fully controlled, there is an inner container, which allows air to recirculate.  The consequence of this is that the food is for the most part "cooked by hot air!"  Only a portion of the total air-draft escapes out the stack:  quite a lot of it recirculates, perhaps "repeatedly."

 

When you shut down a "simple charcoal kettle," there's nothing left there but ash.  However, "the Kamado experience" is typically that the fuel-grate is mostly full, ready to be re-used next time.  This, in and of itself, is a simple demonstration of the fundamental differences in the two cooking processes.  Although "both of them are [obviously ...] a grill," I do think that the differences end there.

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