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Brisket pointers


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Last weekend I cooked my first brisket which was a bit under 11 lbs before trimming. It turned out ok but a bit over cooked and slightly burnt on the extremities.
I cooked at +-10 degrees 250 dome temp With digital probe, wrapped it in paper at about 165 and pulled it when all areas were at least 203. I wrapped it in foil and towels and let it rest for one hour in a cooler.
I think the ends got hotter cause the brisket is bigger than my heat deflector and I’d like to get a more even cook if possible. I cooked it on the lower grate and thought of maybe trying on upper grate.
Does anyone have any pointers for my next brisket this weekend? The smallest brisket I could find was almost 17 lbs, would separating the point and the flat and cooking separate on 2 level grate be my best option?
tia

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I did my first brisket this past weekend.  Here is what I did, and it came out as good as some of the places I have been in Austin, TX.  Take it out of the refrigerator at least 3 hours before cooking, and add your rub.  I used salt, paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, cayenne pepper, thyme, ground mustard powder and oregano. 

 

Leave the brisket on a platter on the counter.  Set up the grill with the heat deflectors as low as you can get them in the grill, and the grates up as high as you can get them.  I cooked at 190 degrees for 24 hours.  You can certainly go higher.

 

I laid the brisket across a Weber rib rack (15+ pounds untrimmed) to keep it over the deflectors and away from the edges of the grill.

 

I pulled it at 160 when the bark passed the scratch test, and wrapped it.  I continued cooking wrapped until it was 205 degree internal temp and probe tender.

 

I separated the flat and point, and made burnt ends which went back on the grill for 2 more hours at 190.  I put the flat in a cooler that had a pot of boiling water in it to warm it up, and rested it for 2 hours.

 

It sliced very easily, and slices would fold completely in half over your finger.

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Looking at that particular brisket, there was no way that the end of that flat would survive the cook, imo.

 

My three 'take it or leave it' suggestions are:

  1. Try to find briskets with the thickest and most even proportioned flats that I can. A
  2. Adopt the method of cooking to doneness and not just an arbitrary number like 203°. There is a possibility that the brisket is done way before then.
  3. Do a little research on cutting a brisket. Cutting against the grain on a brisket makes for a much more pleasing eating experience. And a brisket's grain changes in at least three different places.
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To add on to this topic. I found a 2.2 pound brisket at Costco yesterday. From everything I have read here, I know that it will be done when it is done. Since this is a small flat with a uniform thickness and a nice fat cap, what would be the general time that I might be looking at for it to be either close, or done cooking?

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36 minutes ago, Golf Griller said:

To add on to this topic. I found a 2.2 pound brisket at Costco yesterday. From everything I have read here, I know that it will be done when it is done. Since this is a small flat with a uniform thickness and a nice fat cap, what would be the general time that I might be looking at for it to be either close, or done cooking?

 

I don't cook flats and my one extremely reluctant attempt to cook a neighbor's flat was so disappointing imo, I never will again so, I'm afraid I can't be of any help here. But boy that is a very small cut. I wouldn't even know how to venture a guess. Hope some flat cookers will chime in...

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55 minutes ago, Golf Griller said:

To add on to this topic. I found a 2.2 pound brisket at Costco yesterday. From everything I have read here, I know that it will be done when it is done. Since this is a small flat with a uniform thickness and a nice fat cap, what would be the general time that I might be looking at for it to be either close, or done cooking?

 

I bought a similar cut from my local Food Lion and it worked out to be about an hour per pound at 250F.  I let it rest for several hours in a cooler and it wasn't half bad.  The problem though is it won't take on much smoke so temper your expectations accordingly.  The end result was good, but it didn't match up with what I can get from my local BBQ joints.

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i would take a look at this for a couple good ideas. Of particular interest is his observation on point vs flat.

https://recipes.hastybake.com/how-to/arnietex-brisket-recipe/

I start probing for tenderness at@ 190. I cooked a 4 + lb piece recently, it took 6 1/2 hours and was pretty uniform in temp, but the thick fatty end was tender before the leaner end.

 

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4 hours ago, CentralTexBBQ said:

 

I don't cook flats and my one extremely reluctant attempt to cook a neighbor's flat was so disappointing imo, I never will again so, I'm afraid I can't be of any help here. But boy that is a very small cut. I wouldn't even know how to venture a guess. Hope some flat cookers will chime in...

I would like to do a point, but I can't find a point unless it is attached to the full packer brisket. I'm trying that size brisket flat because it is just me and my wife that will be eating it.

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5 hours ago, Golf Griller said:

I would like to do a point, but I can't find a point unless it is attached to the full packer brisket. I'm trying that size brisket flat because it is just me and my wife that will be eating it.

 

Understood, I'm always cooking brisket for family basically. If I cooked for just my wife and I, I'd be freezing brisket and I don't particularly like the idea of that. In the case of this flat-that's a tiny, tiny piece of meat comparatively speaking. I have a two pound ribeye in the fridge that I was too tired to cook for Father's Day- (and I'm glad I'm responding to you because I just reminded myself it was there). :-D

 

Anyway, while I don't have an idea as to the length of cook, I would lean toward cooking as low and as slow as I possibly could. Costco generally carries USDA Prime which could work to your favor. My concern would be it's thickness and drying it out.

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On 6/19/2020 at 8:10 PM, CentralTexBBQ said:

Looking at that particular brisket, there was no way that the end of that flat would survive the cook, imo.

 

My three 'take it or leave it' suggestions are:

  1. Try to find briskets with the thickest and most even proportioned flats that I can. A
  2. Adopt the method of cooking to doneness and not just an arbitrary number like 203°. There is a possibility that the brisket is done way before then.
  3. Do a little research on cutting a brisket. Cutting against the grain on a brisket makes for a much more pleasing eating experience. And a brisket's grain changes in at least three different places.

Maybe I could have done some burnt ends with the ends of that brisket.

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Burnt ends are taken from the point only, really.  I'm very old school and so, I don't even think in terms of separating of point and flat or burnt ends. But, it could have worked out well for you.

 

One thing I do from time to time with unusually large briskets (19+ pounders), is to slip pieces of thick foil underneath the ends that overhang the deflector plates. Once the brisket shrinks, I discard them. But, they generally help with overexposure to heat on the ends.

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On 6/24/2020 at 2:33 PM, Golf Griller said:

I would like to do a point, but I can't find a point unless it is attached to the full packer brisket. I'm trying that size brisket flat because it is just me and my wi

Same here. When I cook more

freeze some portions
invite guests 

give some to family

This was sold as brisket, neither flat nor point. 2.9 pounds. (Aldi)  Finished at 1pound 10 oz.

5 hours @ 225-250, I used some of Arnie Tex’s methods, on the Kamado.

Thick in the center of the grill, narrow near the edge of the deflector, where the heat is.

I always look for the fat , even in the “flats” sold at Costco.

 

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