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Reverse Searing NY Strip


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Hi Guys,

 

Took my first crack at reverse Searing on my KDC2. Turned out good and to everyone's approval. Did them at 225*C and had a meat thermometer in. Timing should be about and hour but they got to 110* really quick (20-25 min) and a couple were even higher when I took them off to rest.

 

Only one was cut properly at 2.5" think but that one was still ready to rest only about 10 min after the others. They turned out and but should I have gone with 3"? I still felt the 2.5" steak could have been better and all we're closer to medium than med-rare.

 

Any suggestions are welcomed, trying to get better!

 

Thanks guys, cheers!

 

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2.5" should be fine for reverse sear. I have done steaks around that thick (or even closer to 2") and it took closer to 45-60 min to hit 110 (though I have been shooting for 115 lately). Have you calibrated the thermometer for the dome of the cooker?

 

How long did you sear them after they rested and you got the grill hot? The secret that helped me crack the reverse sear method was not to worry about the temperature after the initial smoking phase. Like I mentioned, I go to about 115 then pull them when I get the grill good and hot. Once we're in the ~550 range (very loosely... could be 500, 600 -  just good and hot), I throw the steaks on for 1 minute per side (dome down). After that they come off - I DON'T CARE what the instant read thermometer says. When I used to care, I would get readings that seemed too low (factoring in some carry over - but not enough!), and I'd keep them on another minute or 2 or 3. Big mistake that resulted in overcooked steaks. And, yes, my instant read is a Thermapen that I have tested for accuracy very recently. 

 

Mine come out nice and medium rare now. If you only want to go to 110, maybe you need 90 seconds per side or so? I dunno - you can definitely play with the variables, but I the point is that it's very easy to overcook the steaks during the sear phase if you pay too much heed to temperature readings. 

 

-Andrew

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