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Brisket and Pork Shoulder on a Big Joe II


taperunner
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Hey Everyone.  I'm planning on cooking a full brisket (guess it'll be around 20lbs before trimming) and a pork shoulder this weekend.  Ideally I'd toss them both on around 10PM Saturday night, let em go overnight and then do whatever I need to in the morning.  Just looking for any advice or gotcha's I should look out for.  I've never cooked two things at once like this.  In my head I think I should be fine.  Setting it up for 225 and letting them go mostly unattended for roughly 8-10 hours (I'll have an alarm set for the temperature but I won't be checking them, opening the dome, spraying, ect.  I'll be asleep).

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You "traditionalists" with your overnight cooks...  I wish I had your drive/determination.  Long since given up for cooking both at higher temps.  Same day.  No worries.  No stall.  Just tossing that out there.

 

Love to see how it comes out so post some pics!

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2 hours ago, BURGER MEISTER said:

Chances are both won't be done at the same time (that's just life,........well mine anyway) :rofl: but that's why FTC'n was created.  I've kept things quite warm for 3-5 hours doin it.  

Yeah, I'm not worried about that at all.  Just looking for any weirdness that maybe I haven't encountered.

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1 hour ago, SmallBBQr said:

You "traditionalists" with your overnight cooks...  I wish I had your drive/determination.  Long since given up for cooking both at higher temps.  Same day.  No worries.  No stall.  Just tossing that out there.

 

Love to see how it comes out so post some pics!

Hahah I mostly agree with you.  But I have a four month old and I'd like to eat around 3 for a small get together we're having.   I don't really want to wake up at say 2am to start this.  So it's really just a timing issue is all.

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Just now, taperunner said:

Hahah I mostly agree with you.  But I have a four month old and I'd like to eat around 3 for a small get together we're having.   I don't really want to wake up at say 2am to start this.  So it's really just a timing issue is all.

 

That's what I am getting at...by cooking at higher temps,  you can cook a decent sized brisket in 6-7 hours.  No getting up in the middle of the night for me!

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1 minute ago, SmallBBQr said:

 

That's what I am getting at...by cooking at higher temps,  you can cook a decent sized brisket in 6-7 hours.  No getting up in the middle of the night for me!

Oh I gotcha.  I misunderstood.  I'm not sure how I feel about that.  I'll try it at some point but definitely don't want to experiment with a method I'm not familiar with when I haver a group to feed!

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23 hours ago, SmallBBQr said:

... you can cook a decent sized brisket in 6-7 hours.

Several ways.... Dry aging is my preference. Leave the brisket on a grate, uncovered, in the refrigerator for a day or two. Stall-causing moisture evaporates before you start cooking. 

 

On 8/26/2020 at 12:51 PM, taperunner said:

Ideally I'd toss them both on around 10PM Saturday night, let em go overnight and then do whatever I need to in the morning.

Comments to the contrary, this isn't a bad plan, as long as you're ready to keep one warm, or process it early. Pork butt is ready at 195F internal, brisket really needs 205F and a long slow rest. I'd use a thermometer alarm to wake up. Foil them when they hit target temps, if you haven't already, and into the cooler until you're ready to eat, or process for later.

 

Normally, I'd suggest splitting the cook because pork butt reheats beautifully. Your call. Just be careful how much you bite off; remember to have fun,

 

Stay well

Frank

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23 hours ago, fbov said:

Several ways.... Dry aging is my preference. Leave the brisket on a grate, uncovered, in the refrigerator for a day or two. Stall-causing moisture evaporates before you start cooking. 

 

Comments to the contrary, this isn't a bad plan, as long as you're ready to keep one warm, or process it early. Pork butt is ready at 195F internal, brisket really needs 205F and a long slow rest. I'd use a thermometer alarm to wake up. Foil them when they hit target temps, if you haven't already, and into the cooler until you're ready to eat, or process for later.

 

Normally, I'd suggest splitting the cook because pork butt reheats beautifully. Your call. Just be careful how much you bite off; remember to have fun,

 

Stay well

Frank

Great advice and thank you!  I actually realized I don't need to do this.  I have half a pork butt frozen in a vacuum bag.  I'm just going to toss that in a sous vide bath and boom.  I was saving it for a rainy day and it'll work well here.

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On 8/27/2020 at 6:03 PM, CentralTexBBQ said:

I have never experienced this

First off, I misspoke; I'm not "dry aging" so much as I'm "dry brining." I currently have a pair of sirloin cap roasts, aka culotte, salted and drying in the fridge for ~27 hrs. now. This had s become tender cut SOP....

 

I traditionally had seasoned brisket the day before, and bagged it air tight. Last time, I salted it a day early and let it sit open in the fridge for a couple days. Came out great, and cooked fast. Second time, I used too much salt and gave it too much time and got something more like pastrami than brisket... but it cooked fast. 

 

Next time.... it's just that we're eating sirloin these days! 

Frank

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15 hours ago, fbov said:

First off, I misspoke; I'm not "dry aging" so much as I'm "dry brining." I currently have a pair of sirloin cap roasts, aka culotte, salted and drying in the fridge for ~27 hrs. now. This had s become tender cut SOP....

 

I traditionally had seasoned brisket the day before, and bagged it air tight. Last time, I salted it a day early and let it sit open in the fridge for a couple days. Came out great, and cooked fast. Second time, I used too much salt and gave it too much time and got something more like pastrami than brisket... but it cooked fast. 

 

Next time.... it's just that we're eating sirloin these days! 

Frank

 

I totally understood you and I do quite a bit of dry brining myself, often for three days or longer if my wife does not veto the 20lbs or so hunk of meat sitting there uncovered in the fridge. Anyway, I have never had them cook any faster than any other method as a general rule.

 

That said, I do realize every piece of meat (i.e., ever cow) is different and some cook faster for whatever reason– 18lbers that cook faster than 14lbers, etc. I just haven't been able to narrow it down to dry brining. Intersting concept however.

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