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aborted pork butt cook - how to recover


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Did my first pork butt cook on my new kamado joe classic III yesterday. I guess i didn't put enough charcoal in, because my fuel ran out at 165 degrees not long after coming out of the stall, after about 8 hours total cook time between 230-250F.

 

It was too late to try to start a new fire and keep cooking, so i pulled the butts, wrapped them in foil, and put them in the fridge.

 

Has anyone ever done this before? I know i got passed the stall because the temp was stuck at 152 for about 3.5 hours and then started rising.  Assuming I can just put them back on and cook to ~200F like i normally would? Any idea of how long this will take?  Maybe about 4 hours? 

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Welcome @incoming!  I think I would have just reverted to the oven at the point I pulled them if one was available. At that point they shoulders had already taken on all the smoke they were going to. Not sure how to approach a recook - maybe someone else will have some insight and chime in. 
 

Don’t be afraid to start with a very full firebox next time around. You’re control your temp with airflow regulation and not amount of fuel. 

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yeah i thought about that....long story short it was a long day and i couldn't stay up until 1am or whenever to pull it when done, and since it was already at 165 i thought it would have overdone it to let it go overnight at that point, even at 225. 

 

I'm going to throw it back on the smoker at 225-250 today and see what happens. Worst case its like putting it in the oven but with smoke :-)  Uncertainty is of course what it did to the pork to cool down to 35 degrees over night...then come back up

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1 hour ago, incoming said:

yeah i thought about that....long story short it was a long day and i couldn't stay up until 1am or whenever to pull it when done, and since it was already at 165 i thought it would have overdone it to let it go overnight at that point, even at 225. 

 

I'm going to throw it back on the smoker at 225-250 today and see what happens. Worst case its like putting it in the oven but with smoke :-)  Uncertainty is of course what it did to the pork to cool down to 35 degrees over night...then come back up

I'd wrap it in foil before putting it back on the smoker to help prevent drying it out.

 

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Crock Pot.  Drop a cup of pure Apple juice or Cider in the bottom, insert a temperature probe and let it go on low heat until 201 degrees internal is hit.  Turn it off and let it coast for an hour then shed it and enjoy.

 

i agree that the bark will be set, and there is no advantage to further smoke.

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I went ahead and finished them on the kamado. I recognize I'm not getting anything out of the smoke at that point, but I figured the kamado environment would be moister than the oven. And I was afraid re-heating in foil might ruin the bark. And my oven is inside, where it isn't sunny :-)

 

Took about 4 hours at 260 to finish them. Temp went up pretty linearly, no stall. Cooked them to 196 and 198, foiled them and let them rest in a cooler, hopefully to reach 203. But i didn't want to risk keeping them in there any longer than necessary. 

 

Result was fine. Family loved it and I would have proudly served to guests. One of them came out almost identical to typical results i got on my previous akorn, the other was maybe a touch drier. Both with a little thicker bark, probably from the longer smoke time at the lower temp the kamado joe can sustain vs the akorn.

 

The one being drier was probably only noticeable to me because i was paranoid about it. With some eastern NC vinegar sauce, it was certainly indistinguishable. Not sure whether the drier one was one pulled at 196 or the one pulled at 198.  

 

Anyway, if anyone stumbles across this post again - I wouldn't plan it this way, and the best thing to do would have been to just finish them in the oven that night, but at least this proved that it can work out fine to finish them the next day. Pork butts are a good forgiving choice for a first cook on a new set up!

 

Appreciate the tips - look forward to coming back to the forum often! 

 

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Experimenting is part of the fun of using a kamado. I quite often take mine of at about 170 and wrap with a cup of broth (will have to try the cider) and plop in the oven at 225 -250 they're always moist and you have a little juice to mix in to the pork There is no cast in stone way to do pulled pork as you have just found out. Glad your guests enjoyed the pork do you make your own vinegar sauce?

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3 hours ago, len440 said:

 do you make your own vinegar sauce?

yup.  pretty simple/standard eastern NC sauce.  Cider & white vinegar, salt, pepper, red pepper, red pepper sauce, and brown sugar

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16 hours ago, incoming said:

I went ahead and finished them on the kamado. I recognize I'm not getting anything out of the smoke at that point, but I figured the kamado environment would be moister than the oven. And I was afraid re-heating in foil might ruin the bark. And my oven is inside, where it isn't sunny :-)

 

Took about 4 hours at 260 to finish them. Temp went up pretty linearly, no stall. Cooked them to 196 and 198, foiled them and let them rest in a cooler, hopefully to reach 203. But i didn't want to risk keeping them in there any longer than necessary. 

 

Result was fine. Family loved it and I would have proudly served to guests. One of them came out almost identical to typical results i got on my previous akorn, the other was maybe a touch drier. Both with a little thicker bark, probably from the longer smoke time at the lower temp the kamado joe can sustain vs the akorn.

 

The one being drier was probably only noticeable to me because i was paranoid about it. With some eastern NC vinegar sauce, it was certainly indistinguishable. Not sure whether the drier one was one pulled at 196 or the one pulled at 198.  

 

Anyway, if anyone stumbles across this post again - I wouldn't plan it this way, and the best thing to do would have been to just finish them in the oven that night, but at least this proved that it can work out fine to finish them the next day. Pork butts are a good forgiving choice for a first cook on a new set up!

 

Appreciate the tips - look forward to coming back to the forum often! 

 

I've done this [intentionally] before and it worked out just fine. Pork butts are pretty forgiving.

 

https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/cook-today-serve-tomorrow-wozniak-way/

 

Dave

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