Jump to content

Questions on the whole resting thing


Recommended Posts

So I've always heard about "resting meat" after a cook. I'm not very good at it by the way. Should all meats be rested? Steaks, roasts, turkey, even chicken?? So I just read on here about someone resting a roast for like 45 minutes... then do you just serve your meal cold?

Educate me please.... Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The purpose of a rest, as I understand it is to give the juices in the meat you cooked time  to re penetrate and avoid them just running out all over your cutting board leaving your brisket or roast more dry in taste and texture. I rest brisket for up to maybe an hour after a long cook. However I rest it in a yeti roadie cooler that I have warmed with hot water during the last hour of my cook. So the meat stays a nice steamy warm. I wrap the brisket in fresh butcher paper, and then some clean old towels and then put it in my dried but warm cooler.  I do much the same thing but with a 20 minute rest for Prime rib Tri Tip. Meat comes out great, usually the length of the rest is determined by when I finish the cook, and when dinner is planned and the sides are ready. I rest steaks about 15 minutes tented in aluminum foil. I don't really rest poultry. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

The purpose of a rest, as I understand it is to give the juices in the meat you cooked time  to re penetrate and avoid them just running out all over your cutting board leaving your brisket or roast more dry in taste and texture. I rest brisket for up to maybe an hour after a long cook. However I rest it in a yeti roadie cooler that I have warmed with hot water during the last hour of my cook. So the meat stays a nice steamy warm. I wrap the brisket in fresh butcher paper, and then some clean old towels and then put it in my dried but warm cooler.  I do much the same thing but with a 20 minute rest for Prime rib Tri Tip. Meat comes out great, usually the length of the rest is determined by when I finish the cook, and when dinner is planned and the sides are ready. I rest steaks about 15 minutes tented in aluminum foil. I don't really rest poultry. 

I understand the reasoning of the rest, but...

Seems to me resting a steak 15 minutes ,even a nice thick ribeye in tin foil ,would make for a cold or at least a cool piece of meat. Not a good temp to eat it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Typical steaks don't need a 15 minute rest.  Maybe 5 minutes.  I have no problem cutting into a cooked steak within 2 minutes of it coming off the grill.  The juice retention notion from resting is mostly false anyway.  The meat will be slightly more tender after resting a few minutes as the muscle fibers will have some time to relax.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's what I consistently do:  cook the steak until the meat-thermometer tells me that it is 10ºF below my desired target temperature.  (e.g. "140ºF = medium rare," etc.)  I then remove it from the fire, place it in a pan, and "tent" it with aluminum foil without removing the thermometer.

 

Over the next ten to fifteen minutes, you will see that the meat continues to rise in temperature, even though it is no longer on the fire.  It will rise "those remaining ten degrees."

 

So – this is why that "medium rare" steak that you took off the fire tasted "medium" when you began to eat it:  it continued to cook by residual heat.  It went from 140ºF to 150ºF, all on its own.

 

And, yes – "resting" gives the flavors time to equalize, entirely apart from the increase in heat.  "Meats really do taste better" that way.  ("Is this the secret of 'leftover pizza?'")

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2021 at 5:39 AM, A.O. said:

So I've always heard about "resting meat" after a cook. I'm not very good at it by the way. Should all meats be rested? Steaks, roasts, turkey, even chicken?? So I just read on here about someone resting a roast for like 45 minutes... then do you just serve your meal cold?

Educate me please.... Thanks

 

The reason for resting has already been explained, but for me, I base my resting time in proportion to cooking time.  So something I cook for many many hours, I typically rest a very long time.  Something that cooks hot/fast, I rest (typically) a much shorter time.

 

Some examples....

 

  • Brisket, pulled pork.  I cook for 8+ hours....I usually rest (in a cooler, wrapped) at least 1-2 hours - but I've rested as long as 3-4 hours with great results.  Wrap in foil, towels, and place in cooler.  Amazing!!
  • Turkey is somewhat a special case to me....the longer it rests, the better it is.  I can (spatchcocked) cook a 15 pound turkey in 60-90 minutes.  I still let it rest a MINIMUM of 1 hour (again, covered and usually in a cooler).  Try it...it is SOOOO much better after a long rest.  Even after resting 1 hour, the interior by the breast bone is still so hot you burn your hands anyways.
  • Steaks...usually 5 minutes roughly cooking time....resting time 5-10 minutes.  The cooking process sometimes dictates the rest though....reverse sear - not needed as much (for example)
  • Pork tenderloin.  Cook 20 min,  rest for a good 10 min.
  • Chicken we usually rest at least 15-20 minutes...bigger the bird, longer the rest.  Even uncovered on the counter, interior is still too hot to touch comfortably with bare hands.

Serving "hot" protein is a bit of a myth anyways. It does not really get "cold" while resting.  If you take a nice slice of HOT roast beef, turkey etc. and put it on a plate, it drops to room temperature before it hits the table anyways unless you are doing a table service.  It's more important to serve on a pre-heated dinner plate and serve with a nice hot gravy with hot side dishes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CentralTexBBQ said:

and.. how did we get on the topic of steak? :rofl:

Because you rest steak also

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In general, resting is really important. It allows the meat fibres to relax and the "juice" to get reabsorbed and more evenly distributed.

 

But it does depend how you have cooked the meat, and what the cut is.

 

For things like steaks, only a short rest is needed. But if you have cooked it sous-vide or reverse sear, then no rest is really needed at all.

 

For large cuts, yes definitely let it rest.

 

I am just cooking a beef sirloin roast right now using reverse sear. I cooked it at 200F until the internal temperature hit 120F, now it's sitting under foil for about an hour while we roast potatoes. I will hit it at about 475F for about 5 minutes to firm up the crust before I carve it, but then wont rest it again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...