Jump to content

Super long cook, why?


Recommended Posts

Ok, maybe this is why my smoking abilities are marginal! Never tried a brisket or butt, but I am dying to try. but why the extreme long cook? And I know everyone does it, everytime I try I end up with some sort of dried up cinder that looks like a meteorite or something! (traditional smoker)

So is there a tutorial somewhere that explains the whole what where when why and how of the process?? 

I see Johns article on a boston butt for pulled pork, but he still only cooks it for 4-6 hours till it reaches a particular temp. Some of you talk about 12-14 hour or longer cooks why? 

And if this Kamado keeps the temp so well why a temp controller?

Sorry, new Kamado guy just trying to figure everything out.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20190903_BookTitle.jpg

Have you read this? Not sure of the scientific reason but it works. The length of depends on the temp your running temp of meat when putting it on the grill the size of the meat A 4 pound brisket will be done before a 10 pounder will be. A big key to remember is the meat is in charge and will be done when it wants to be done. Take some note for the first several cooks to compare what worked and what didn't. Don't get too wrapped up in times each roast will be slightly different. Don't give up it will come Ribs are a good choice to start with there forgiving and cook some what quick 5-6 hours and will help you learn your grill. Good luck and keep us posted

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forgot to answer your last question. A temp controller is not really needed to use the grill. My classic II can run for at least 14 hrs at 225 degrees. Learn how to use the vents to control the grill before you use a controller 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, len440 said:

Forgot to answer your last question. A temp controller is not really needed to use the grill. My classic II can run for at least 14 hrs at 225 degrees. Learn how to use the vents to control the grill before you use a controller 

So what do you cook that needs 14 hours?

And I have read part of that you referred to in your first post, still working on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, len440 said:

Forgot to answer your last question. A temp controller is not really needed to use the grill. My classic II can run for at least 14 hrs at 225 degrees. Learn how to use the vents to control the grill before you use a controller 

So I'm cooking a pork tenderloin today and its like my thermometer is broken, got it set at 250 deg and it hasn't moved in 4 hours!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, A.O. said:

So I'm cooking a pork tenderloin today and its like my thermometer is broken, got it set at 250 deg and it hasn't moved in 4 hours!

If you're talking about the dome thermometer, you should verify it's accuracy first thing before you trust it.  Easy to test and adjust on a KJ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, BURGER MEISTER said:

If you're talking about the dome thermometer, you should verify it's accuracy first thing before you trust it.  Easy to test and adjust on a KJ.

I was more just commenting on how well it holds temperature, especially compared to what I have now! But next time I fire it up I'll check it against my instant read thermometer I have.

When I shut it down the thermometer dropped so I'm sure its working.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For about $30 at Home Depot, after my previous thermometer suddenly died, I bought a very nice unit that has both an oven-temperature sensor and a food-temperature sensor ... and, it's wireless.  (Which is actually quite handy – just drop the display unit in your shirt pocket.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also – the very first time I tried to "super long cook" a roast, I did it in my kitchen oven.  I set the thing at 200ºF and put a roast in it at 8:00 AM, sitting in a glass tray loosely covered with aluminum foil, and left it there all day.  The result was "fall apart when your fork first touched it" delicious.  I've repeated this idea (also in the oven ...) with tarragon and other marinades.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, A.O. said:

So what do you cook that needs 14 hours?

And I have read part of that you referred to in your first post, still working on it

If you have a large hunk of meat ( like a 10 lb brisket 10 lbs x1.25 hrs per pound = about 12.5 hrs.) it will take a while the meat the temp will effect the time.

 

22 hours ago, A.O. said:

So I'm cooking a pork tenderloin today and its like my thermometer is broken, got it set at 250 deg and it hasn't moved in 4 hours!

If this is the dome thermometer then the grill is stabilized  

 

22 hours ago, BURGER MEISTER said:

If you're talking about the dome thermometer, you should verify it's accuracy first thing before you trust it.  Easy to test and adjust on a KJ

Burger Meister was referring to how accurate the dome thermometer  was some of these can be 30 degrees + off

To clarify one of my answers i do have a controller but for the butt I did Monday I only used it to monitor grate temp and meat temp the fan was not used and held a solid 225 for about 6 hrs. When you do a butt or a brisket beware of the stall. For a test run try  chuck roast cheaper than a brisket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lenth of cook time is driven by three major factors; size of cut, cook temp and how doneness is measured. I'm cooking around 270 – 285° so, even my largest briskets are usually done around the 10 hour mark or so. I use to start them the first two hours @225° before raising the temps and that added another hour to hour and a half to finish.

 

I've found temp controllers to be totally unnecessary in my cooks. I am rather meticulous in how I load the lump, light the lump and manage the fire. So, I sleep nights on long cooks without any concerns. On the rare chance that the temps have significantly fluctuated overnight- I still am going to pull the meat when done and not solely by projected time, etc. So, it's no biggie in those exceptional cases.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all, I picked up a 6 1/2 pound Boston butt yesterday, along with a whole chicken and some ribs to try, anyway I'm probably going to cook the butt Wednesday and give a longer cook a try on this thing. Bought a bag of RO charcoal to try as well, I'm hoping its not all little pieces like the bag of B&B was..

John has a full rundown on a Boston butt and I'm just going to follow that..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/20/2021 at 12:30 PM, A.O. said:

So I'm cooking a pork tenderloin today and its like my thermometer is broken, got it set at 250 deg and it hasn't moved in 4 hours!


A pork tenderloin is typically only about a pound in weight or slightly more.  I would typically dry rub it, drop it onto the grate at about 225 degrees for about 50-60 minutes, then open the vents for another 15-20 minutes.  Done!  You want that meat barely beyond rare.  Still pinkish and a bit moist.  4 hours at 250 sounds like a bit of overkill.

 

As for a pork shoulder, I typically plan for 1hr,15mins to 1:30 per pound at 250, until I reach an internal of 202 degrees and a probe slides in easily. That typical runs 10-12 hours for an 8 pound shoulder.  The slightly higher grill temperature allows for the fat to render more completely, and the longer time breaks down the muscle.

 

Hope this helps you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, JeffieBoy said:


A pork tenderloin is typically only about a pound in weight or slightly more.  I would typically dry rub it, drop it onto the grate at about 225 degrees for about 50-60 minutes, then open the vents for another 15-20 minutes.  Done!  You want that meat barely beyond rare.  Still pinkish and a bit moist.  4 hours at 250 sounds like a bit of overkill.

 

As for a pork shoulder, I typically plan for 1hr,15mins to 1:30 per pound at 250, until I reach an internal of 202 degrees and a probe slides in easily. That typical runs 10-12 hours for an 8 pound shoulder.  The slightly higher grill temperature allows for the fat to render more completely, and the longer time breaks down the muscle.

 

Hope this helps you.

Definitely was overkill!! tasted good but definitely overdone. We still enjoyed it as Scotts chips! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A.O.  Jeffie had a good guide for his tenderloin buy keep in mind his grill is different than yours, and the time can be different. On the last one you did keep a log on size of fire  temp of grill size of pork loin , this one was over done so shorten the time on the next one till you like the results, also the pork can change the time also. With the pork butt you will encounter the "stall" where the internal temp stops rising and just sits there for an hour or 2 this is normal but the first time you might find it confusing and be tempted to up the grill temp Don't. I've read that this is caused by fat melting inside the meat and cooling it. A little trick is to pull the butt at 175 or so wrap in foil with a cup or so of liquid I use chicken stock. This will help to keep it moist and give you some juice to use when reheating the next day Great Tacos. either put back on grill or in a 250 degree oven till internal temp of 205. If you follow Johns direction you wont go wrong. What kind of thermometer are you using to measure the pork temp?

The charcoal will be a crap shoot been there with the charcoal crumbs I'm a strong believer in clear plastic bags

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...