Jump to content

First Time Brisket, have done a lot of research just want some tips.


Recommended Posts

Hello all, first all love this forum and its community. I've tried a brisket from a friend who got me into kamado cooking and ive tackled things like ribs, boston butt, pork shoulders but I would love to tackle a brisket. I've done some research but would love some clarity on some topics.

1) Plan to trim the brisket after buying it, I am not a butcher by all means but i've read some guidelines on orientation and removing the fat. Experienced people anything you've learned that have helped you that I may not read about?

2) Season the brisket, and do not wrap it on the intial cook. My friend also uses a drip tray with water for moisture but i've read you do not need that.

3) Cook at 225-250 for 12 hours or so, each brisket is different until you reach an internal temp of 210.

4) When it stalls, take it out and wrap it in butcher paper to finish

I likely plan to not be perfect on my first cook but I hope to not destroy the thing. Being a bit drier or soggier is not a big deal as long as its edible and ill be able to tweak it. I use the fire Fireboard 2 temp controller with a fan and I love the thing so hopefully that makes my life easier. Any tips are appreciated and thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are going to trigger a lot of varied responses and many people are die hard fans about their methods.  Cool thing I noticed about this forum is you are not going to get throttled.  

First things first, have fun and relax this is a great challenge and you will nail it.  Season it well in advance and as far as drip pans go, I have done with and without them, preferring to go without as its a pain to clean up and I prefer the end result anyway.  Finishing temp?  Best advice I received was the fork test.  If the fork goes in smoothly, you're done, even at lower temps than you suggested.  Works like a charm.  The last thing you mentioned was the stall.  The collagen is breaking down and it takes its own sweet time.  Each brisket seems to be different and don't rush it by raising temps.  Take pictures would ya.  Have fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I usually season my beef brisket a couple days ahead of team and leave it in the fridge unwrapped before smoking.  This will help dry the moisture from the outer part of the brisket.

 

I've heard about people using a water pan to keep the brisket moist but I've never used a one but I do use a drip trap to catch the drippings.

 

I smoke the brisket until the crust has been set.....that's when you your seasoning is 'dried' onto the outer part of your brisket.  At that point, I will wrap the brisket in peach paper and place back onto the smoker.  I will then set my temperature probe to 190F to alert me...just as a reminder to probe the brisket for tenderness.

 

Good luck and have fun!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My tendency is this.  I want to emphasize it's a slow process so patience pays off.  Let's just say I want it on the table on Saturday.  I will cut up, trimming all the hard fat and stuff I don't want in my mouth and I do probably take off too much, no apologies and season it by Thursday leaving it overnight in the fridge.  Pull it out for several hours on Friday and I notice that the seasoning seems to adhere to the meat and looks even better while coming to room temp.  Get the lump burning and stabilized to the temp you want.  Lower temps seem to be the norm but I have had success with 270 also.  Toss it in that evening and sleep beautiful brisket dreams.   

Now the hard part.  Pulling it and letting it rest.  Foil it, towel it, in the Yeti for a coupled of hours and no peeking.  I will be well worth it and you will smell like smoke for a while.  Have fun  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you again! Could you clarify the resting process, are we talking 1-2 hours? the longer the better? I do not have a Yeti so im assuming just any closed cooler will work.
Also sounds like I am not going to be using a water pan and trust my Kamado, drip pan at most

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Resting" is the secret to many kinds of meat cooking – even in your kitchen stove.  First of all, when you remove the meat from the heat, its internal temperature will continue to rise, about 10ºF.  (Which is the difference between the "medium rare" that you were shooting for and the "medium" that you got.  Take the food off "ten degrees early," then "tent it" under aluminum foil, leaving the food thermometer in place.)

 

"Cooking" is a very disruptive process.  When you take the meat off the heat, subtle changes begin to happen that can't happen "on the fire."  Sometimes I'll cook a piece of meat on Tuesday that I purposely do not intend to eat until Wednesday.  The meat is first let cool down on its own to room temperature, then stored in the refrigerator.  This is particularly true for thicker cuts of meat such as roasts and loins.  (Heat it gently, and incrementally, back to "serving temperature," probably somewhere around 200ºF.)

 

"Leftovers taste different – often, better."  This is why.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cloud you inspired me. Had fish on my mind and it just so happened the brisket is sale.  I grabbed the big one. 
Coincidence, I think not. So instead of talking the talk, I’m gonna walk it.  I let ya know how it goes. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clooud

Yes to all the above so many ways to skin a cat (have no idea where that phrase comes from) and so many ways to smoke something. My only comment to add is beware there are 2 types of meat in a full brisket the point and the flat. From what i gather they cook slightly differently. I have only smoked 2 points so I'm not an expert on brisket. A good way to practice on beef is to use a thick chuck roast. Good luck on your first one. Below is a link to Aaron Franklins brisket cooking site. I'm not saying you should follow it 100%  but it contains a lot of good info.

https://www.smokedbbqsource.com/smoking-your-first-brisket/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Long Island Crutch”.  We forgive you here in Texas. 
This was mine from this morning. It had way too much freezer burn from the big chain that had it on sale. Impulse buy. I will go back to my local butcher for next one.  I also tend to act like Edward Scissor Hands when prepping, but I’m more than happy with the results. 
Clooud, just do it. If you remain apprehensive, let me suggest pork shoulder  

2C44CFE7-AAE1-418D-B1EE-4109D156C45A.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find 210 is too high.  I like @byee’s comment with the probe set for 190.  I usually start probing at 190-195 degrees.  
 

As for resting, the towelling or paper wrap in the cooler is great.  I always toss three (cleaned) bricks into the cooler first as a platform, the pour a freshly boiled kettle of water in so that the meat tray sits slightly above it.  This tempers the resting process and helps prevent the meat drying.

 

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...