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Was in Kroger today and they had Brisket on sale for half price.. I could not resist!!

I HAVE NEVER COOKED BRISKET! But after my success with a pork butt a few days ago I'm fired up to give it a try. No rush on it, its for no specific reason except to practice, its in the fridge and I'm getting ready to research things, trimming,  seasoning, getting the Kamado Joe ready and all that good stuff. I read the thread below by clooud and others and am reading the article posted from Franklin, I also have his book and will look there.

Glad to hear tips and or warnings and what the heck is "stall" I hear about? And peach paper?? What is that?

 

I'll toss in some thoughts and pics as I do this wish me luck..

 

And if this cut of meat is the ugliest you've ever seen, dont tell me, I wasn't sure what to look for and it is what I have to work with this time! :razz:

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Ok, 11 1/4 pounds, right at 8 hours cook time, 2 hours rest time and the verdict is... Incredible!! turned out great, at least in my opinion. soft and moist and just delicious!    

It's all you need for solid temp monitoring.  Been using a similar one for years and have no desire for anything fancier.  I cook, sit in the living room and drink wine, and watch the temps rise....go

Ok, you asked for pics, here is a couple of my work area for fun.        

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So I ordered This little thermometer set up so I dont have to hover around the grill or stay awake if the cook goes long.

 

Amazon.com: ThermoPro TP08S Wireless Digital Meat Thermometer for Grilling Smoker BBQ Grill Oven Thermometer with Dual Probe Kitchen Cooking Food Thermometer: Kitchen & Dining

 

Its not the best but I think it will work for me.

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AO 

good luck on the first brisket. Keep a record of the cook ,grill set up temp meat size ect ect. This will help on the second plus briskets. How big is that bad boy? Going to use a rub? I just use 50/50 miv of salt and pepper. Please keep us posted 

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23 hours ago, len440 said:

AO 

good luck on the first brisket. Keep a record of the cook ,grill set up temp meat size ect ect. This will help on the second plus briskets. How big is that bad boy? Going to use a rub? I just use 50/50 miv of salt and pepper. Please keep us posted 

It is 11 1/4 pounds. I am going to use the same salt pepper 50/50 mix on this first one but maybe throw a little garlic in there as well.

When do you put the rub on.. same day as cook or in advance? I'm probably going to cook it this Thursday, get up early to get it started and try it that evening. That's the plan anyway.

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I usually sprinkle my rub on brisket or any big cut the a few hours before  my cook. After the rub goes on I put the put it  on a cookie pan , cover it with cling rap, and let it sit in the fridge until I put it on the kitchen counter about 30 min before I put it on. Rub seems to cling to the meats surface well. 

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Memorial Day Weekend brisket - that’s as good as it gets! As Burger Meister noted, trim out the hard fat. There’s a thick vein that is in between the flat and point - that chunk under your labels in the pic above. It won’t render, so you might as well get it out. I also trim the overall fat cap down to about 1/4” thick. Lots of seasoning options, but 50/50 salt and course ground pepper ratio is hard to beat on brisket. You’ll probably hit the stall around 165°, which is when the brisket puts out enough moisture that it has an evaporative effect which slows or stops the cooking process. See link below from Amazingribs.com for a better explanation. You can leave the brisket unwrapped, but it will make for a longer cook, sometimes hours longer. You can wrap in either foil or butcher paper to power through the stall. Butcher paper is breathable, so your bark will hold up better, but foil works fine, too.

 

Keep notes on everything from trimming to seasoning to cooking as a reference for future briskets. Enjoy!
 

https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/understanding-and-beating-barbecue-stall-bane-all/

 

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One other note: low and slow is the key to a good brisket.  Brisket is a tough piece of meat. Cook at 225° - 275° and plan for roughly 1 hour per pound. Most people consider it ready when it hits 200° - 205°, but the real key is feel. When you probe it with your thermometer, it should feel like sticking the probe into a jar of peanut butter. And then place your wrapped brisket in a cooler for at least 2 hours. Put a towel around the brisket or place 1 folded towel on the bottom of the cooler under the brisket and 1 on top.

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