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Even a seasoned chef can mess up...


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Here I am...hat in my hands...

Brisket cook on Saturday. All goes really well. 225˚ low 'n slow. Slow roller rockin' it.

Rookie move. What was I thinking??? Evening before, I heavily salt and pepper the meat. I don't have to tell you all the results.

One thing's for sure, that's a mistake, I will never repeat.

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2 hours ago, primotenore said:

Here I am...hat in my hands...

Brisket cook on Saturday. All goes really well. 225˚ low 'n slow. Slow roller rockin' it.

Rookie move. What was I thinking??? Evening before, I heavily salt and pepper the meat. I don't have to tell you all the results.

One thing's for sure, that's a mistake, I will never repeat.

 

What went wrong?  I salt mine at least 24 hours in advance... same with pork butts and prime ribs.

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3 hours ago, primotenore said:

Ok, this is intriguing. Much against my brother's advice (prep-observer), I removed most (95%) of the fat. Brisket was very dry. Was this the fatal error?

 

It shouldn't have been.  The intramuscular fat is the key in a brisket.  I have trimmed briskets and butts nearly bare of external fat with no issues.

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Here are the details of the cook.

1) Night before, trimmed 95% of the fat and heavily seasoned with S&P.

2) 6am, Slo-roller, KJ 225˚

3) @167˚ Wrapped brisket in two layers of foil and added some Apple Cider Vinegar to the wrapped meat. Back on grill.

4) 202-205˚ Pulled the meat. 

5) Wrapped the meat in a towel and let in rest in a cooler for about 2 hours.

That's it.

Meat was very dry. 

 

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1 minute ago, adm said:

You could have just got unlucky with the piece of meat!

I really hope that was the case. It was marked down (50%), but the sell by date was not close.

Honestly, I have cooked briskets on Webers, off-set smokers and now the KJ, NEVER before using the KJ have I had such a dry result. I knew it wasn't the fault of the Kamado.  This was, however, the very first time I removed so much fat. Regardless of the reason behind the dry meat...I missed having that luscious fat-taste and I will definitely leave at least a 1/4" layer of fat.

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43 minutes ago, primotenore said:

I really hope that was the case. It was marked down (50%), but the sell by date was not close.

Honestly, I have cooked briskets on Webers, off-set smokers and now the KJ, NEVER before using the KJ have I had such a dry result. I knew it wasn't the fault of the Kamado.  This was, however, the very first time I removed so much fat. Regardless of the reason behind the dry meat...I missed having that luscious fat-taste and I will definitely leave at least a 1/4" layer of fat.


no one ever convinces me to remove the fat!!! My Memorial Day brisket was a 50% offer, though still a certified angus. It was perfect. I’ve never cooked anything below that quality. 
 

And take this with a grain of salt but, add a probe test to your arsenal before pulling. I’ve probed tender on a brisket as low as 192°; others at 207°. I pull them then  (if I am going to hold them over an extended period, I pull them a little early as they continue to “cook” when holding).

Edited by CentralTexBBQ
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1 hour ago, primotenore said:

I really hope that was the case. It was marked down (50%), but the sell by date was not close.

 

 

What grade of brisket was it...scanned the thread but did not see if you mentioned prime, choice etc?  If it was a low grade brisket with no intermuscular fat, it could easily explain it as well.  Surface fat on a brisket mostly runs off and does not saturate the meat to a great extent. 

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It sounds like a bad/unlucky cut.  You want to use USDA or Canada prime whenever you can.  Choice (US) AAA in Canada can be hit or miss on some cuts. 

 

Applying a 50/50 mix of salt & pepper 24 hours before the cook can help the cut retain more moisture. 

 

Adding an injection on AAA/choice cuts 24 hours before the cook can help with moisture.

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I wish I could remember what grade it was. I will mention that I probed the meat with my instant-read thermometer in different areas and it slipped in and out easily. The first slice passed the "floppy" test and did pull apart easily. Lack of inter-muscular fat was probably the culprit.

 

I appreciate everyone's responses. Thank you.

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