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Brisket cook height


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I'm going to be doing another brisket and was wondering about grate height. I have a few kamados but will be using my new Louisiana grill 24" grey one. My last brisket I cooked was finished on the thin part of the flat way way before the thicker portion, or the point. I had it on the lower grate with the deflector in. The inner section was great when done. 

 

Before cooking, since my brisket previous to that was a bit dry I melted down the soft fat I trimmed off of it in a cast iron pan and injected it into the brisket. For this on I'm wondering if I shoukd use my upper grate to keep it even further from the deflector? If anyone is familiar with the Louisiana grill/pit boss units it's not that high up. Will the extra height even out the heat a bit more? I aim for 225 dome temp and the thermometer is pretty bang on.

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You want completely indirect heat if possible, so far from the direct heat as possible.  Many will also put the fat cap on the bottom as a additional protective layer.  If your kamado has a "hot" area, place the point in that area as well.

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7 minutes ago, SmallBBQr said:

You want completely indirect heat if possible, so far from the direct heat as possible.  Many will also put the fat cap on the bottom as a additional protective layer.  If your kamado has a "hot" area, place the point in that area as well.

I have been putting the fat cap down. Maybe I will try and use the upper grate this time. The design of the Louisiana grill deleflector, like the green egg has 3 large areas for heat to come up. I was considering cutting a pizza stone into 3 equal pie shaped sections to cover those open areas a bit and I think that will work well. 

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I have rotated mine during the cook when I have specific concerns, which seems to help with evening out doneness. Also, I don't know who "invented" the technique (perhaps Louie Mueler's?), but there's a guy I instagram stalk from time to time (Zillas Pit BBQ) who places a cardboard cutout under the brisket. This helps prevent the flat from drying out. Some punch holes in the cardboard to allow smoke to get through. I do think that my drip pan helps with this also but, not as much when I am cooking at higher temps.

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Cardboard?  Really, I gotta see this one. 

 

I'm on a large brisket right now. Its at 191 and been cooking high rack at 225 for 15 hours. This has been one of my longer ones.  Getting hungry, the hard part will be letting it rest.  I have leftover chicken from two days before.    

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