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Smoked Beef Ribs and Sweet Flavor Profile


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I have smoked beef ribs on my KJ a few times using mustard (binder), salt, pepper, celery seed, and paprika.  I used a few chunks of mesquite wood for flavor.  I've noticed a sweet flavor profile (it's very good), and I'm wondering if it is coming from the rendered beef fat or the mesquite wood smoke or both?  Would a different wood such as Oak, Cherry, or Apple also have a sweet flavor profile, or is it just mesquite?  Any thoughts. 

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strange... hmmm... thought I submitted this hours ago... anyway

 

I don't know that wood could ever lend a sweet profile. Ignoring the specific type of mustard (which can be sweet) and the celery seed, I know 100º that salt (and pepper) plus rendered fat = meat candy. I sit whole-heartedly on the no sweet on my beef side of seasoning meat- (i.e., no sugar, no honey, etc.) but the rendered fat from brisket and ribs is an absolute wonderful experience.

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On 7/14/2021 at 8:55 PM, CentralTexBBQ said:

strange... hmmm... thought I submitted this hours ago... anyway

 

I don't know that wood could ever lend a sweet profile. Ignoring the specific type of mustard (which can be sweet) and the celery seed, I know 100º that salt (and pepper) plus rendered fat = meat candy. I sit whole-heartedly on the no sweet on my beef side of seasoning meat- (i.e., no sugar, no honey, etc.) but the rendered fat from brisket and ribs is an absolute wonderful experience.

 

I've often referred to smoked beef ribs as "meat candy" to my wife, and was just wondering what was contributing to the sweet flavor (since I only use salt and pepper).  Sounds like it is the rendered fat + salt, not the smoke.  Thank you for the insight. 

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Most beef is grain/corn/soy finished - practically force fed during the last couple months before market day.  This greatly increases their fat content/marbling and often adds a sweet flavor profile as well.

 

I particularly find American beef fed a high corn diet particularly sweeter than our Canadian where it is almost purely grain finished.

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On 7/16/2021 at 9:32 AM, Salt and Pepper BBQ said:

 

I've often referred to smoked beef ribs as "meat candy" to my wife, and was just wondering what was contributing to the sweet flavor (since I only use salt and pepper).  Sounds like it is the rendered fat + salt, not the smoke.  Thank you for the insight. 

 

Yeah can't find the article at the moment but some time ago I read that the fat rendered into a form of glycol (lol, or some other 'ol'– Erythritol or sorbitol) which is a type of alcohol sugar.

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On 7/14/2021 at 8:55 PM, CentralTexBBQ said:

strange... hmmm... thought I submitted this hours ago... anyway

 

I don't know that wood could ever lend a sweet profile. Ignoring the specific type of mustard (which can be sweet) and the celery seed, I know 100º that salt (and pepper) plus rendered fat = meat candy. I sit whole-heartedly on the no sweet on my beef side of seasoning meat- (i.e., no sugar, no honey, etc.) but the rendered fat from brisket and ribs is an absolute wonderful experience.

Instead of the rendered fat, try a couple strips of bacon on top as you smoke/cook them... mmm mmm good!

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