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So... I did a THING today... and I'll probably be doing it again :)

 

 

 

 

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On my next round with these, I would bet MONEY that in a blind taste test you would NOT be able to figure out these were boiled and not cooked low and slow on a smoker.

 

 

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John Thanks for the good memories! That's the way my Mom did them when i was growing up, I think she called it parboiling , before going on the grill she put paprika on them. Those are nice looking ribs you made and I agree with the blind taste test. I can only imagine what that bite you took tasted like. 

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Parboiling is a technique from years ago.  But~~ Boiling is said to extract flavor from the meat.

Has anyone tried steaming the ribs for an hour or so as an alternative to parboiling?

Then finish over charcoal.

I'm guessing that steam wouldn't extract flavors as much as boiling.

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Paul in AZ writes “Parboiling is a technique from years ago.  But~~ Boiling is said to extract flavor from the meat.”

 

John you are so skilled but I have tried par boiling and found that a great sauce hides the loss of flavor from the meat. In my world I only boil a meat to extract flavor from it for a broth. Not heard of a use for pork broth yet.

 

This may be one of those never ending debate techniques.

 

Cheers

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Had a minute so did a quick internet search. Tried to find an objective reference copying to save us all the reading.

This comes from The Spuceeats. I used the words “par boiling” in my search box.

 

Alternatives 

The choice is yours, but for best flavor and moist spareribs, boiling is not recommended. Long cooking with low heat accomplishes the same goals of tenderizing and rendering the fat without the loss of flavor or moisture. The ways this can be done include:

 
  • Marinades: These are also recommended to add flavor and tenderize ribs.
  • Steaming: If you have a large enough steamer or can improvise one, steam the ribs over water or apple juice for an hour.
  • Slow oven baking: This is a braising method. Prepare a pan of water or apple juice and place the ribs on a rack above them. You can improvise a rack with a row of celery or aluminum foil bunched up into balls in the bottom of the pan. Ensure that the ribs don't touch the liquid. Start the ribs at 350 F and decrease the temperature to 225 F after 15 minutes, baking for about an hour.
  • Slow smoking: Long and slow cooking in a smoker will keep the ribs flavorful.
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I think what John was presenting here was another way to enjoy ribs, and to try different  ways and not  just one way to do them, some foil, some cook fast some slow , with sauce on or sauce on the side. Sort of when asked how do you want your eggs for breakfast. The main point is to enjoy them anyway you like. 

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@mike echo

 

I don't dispute anything you have posted here.  I am also not trying to claim that boiling is the optimal method of cooking ribs :)  

 

As for pork broth, introduce yourself to Tonkotsu Ramen some time :)  

 

My boil here may have, at some level, taken flavor out of the meat.  BUT... I did some rather intense seasoning in my water with salt, onions, garlic, barbecue rub, and some hot sauce.  I should have added a small amount of sugar as well, but my BBQ rub had a little sugar in it....  

 

I made video of this cook that I'll publish on Friday... this was sort of an homage to the ribs I had when I was a kid at home.  My parents, through some ugly trial and error, learned to make ribs this way.  My attempt at the process here was an upgraded version of the way my parents did it.  They never seasoned the water.  The'boil' also should be more appropriately called a slow simmer.   There is a difference....

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9 hours ago, Paul in AZ said:

Parboiling is a technique from years ago.  But~~ Boiling is said to extract flavor from the meat.

Has anyone tried steaming the ribs for an hour or so as an alternative to parboiling?

Then finish over charcoal.

I'm guessing that steam wouldn't extract flavors as much as boiling.

 

I think, based on your comments here, that I will try this.  Steaming will take longer so I'll have to screw around with that but I will most likely use the Anova Precision Oven in its sous vide mode.  It will take at least twice as long if not longer for that stage of the process.  THAT being the case, I'd be better off just cooking a little hotter on the grill if it's still gonna take me 3 to 4 hours to get the cook done.  

 

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Tonkotsu Ramen??? I'll have to track down and try it I'm a Ramen fan ( not the dry bricks you find at wally world). Your right about the simmer as apposed to a boil, more of my memory cells are kicking in She sauced them with a LBJ sauce the the prez supposedly used I think it was from Life magazine . I think I might still have it . Looking forward to the video

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5 hours ago, len440 said:

Tonkotsu Ramen??? I'll have to track down and try it I'm a Ramen fan ( not the dry bricks you find at wally world). 

Tonkotsu broth is made primarily by simmering the crap out of pork leg bones and trotters until they mostly dissolve, yielding a rich creamy whitish broth. I've never made it at home since it takes a very long time and (like most stock recipes) can get smelly, but I have family in the region where it originated so I've eaten a lot of it. I think I've seen recipes for Tonkotsu that take about 30 mins to first boil, drain and rinse, then about an hour more to simmering and skimming, then maybe 6-8 hours of simmering to get a finished product. In a restaurant you would do this for about 2 days.

 

If you like Shoyu Chashu ramen you can make a decent stock in a few hours from beef marrow bones and chicken feet.

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19 hours ago, Paul in AZ said:

Parboiling is a technique from years ago.  But~~ Boiling is said to extract flavor from the meat.

 

I agree wholeheartedly but, I want to be clear that I do not criticize anyone's technique– to each his own. And these methods are means to significantly reduce the cooking times, if that's a factor.

 

I simply have had the misfortune of tasting a sauceless portion of ribs (usually smothered in sauce) from the most famous rib place in town. It was one of the most disgusting thing I'd eaten. Their sauce remains awesome, however.

 

To be fair, they compounded the parboiling by finishing in an oven so, it's not even remotely close to John's technique. But, I left there that day and my preference for ribs was set in stone.

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10 hours ago, John Setzler said:

 

Steaming will take longer so I'll have to screw around with that ...

 

 

I'd be curious if that's actually the case John, as it is possible for steam to be hotter than water. Anyway, it is my preferred way for reheating brisket and it's much quicker than any other method I've used to date.

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On 7/22/2021 at 7:08 PM, CentralTexBBQ said:

I simply have had the misfortune of tasting a sauceless portion of ribs (usually smothered in sauce) from the most famous rib place in town. It was one of the most disgusting thing I'd eaten. Their sauce remains awesome, however.

 

To be fair, they compounded the parboiling by finishing in an oven so, it's not even remotely close to John's technique. But, I left there that day and my preference for ribs was set in stone.

I had ribs there once from their location that is closed near my home. The ribs had a greasy taste. That is the last time I ate ribs at that location. Other locations have been better, but not the greatest.

Edited by Golf Griller
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You boiled ribs?

 

https-bucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-

 

:-D

 

Slathering them with sauce more than likely covered up any difference though*. Did it reduce the cooking time by much? Water is one of our best known solvents..most anything will dissolve in salt. Boiling in water extracts the flavour (and a lot of the nutrients!) from meats or veggies.

 

 

*Its why I like my ribs with no sauce. I want to taste the meat, not some sticky sweet mess.

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