Jump to content

Help. I don't like smoked foods


Recommended Posts

So, this was dumb. I bought the Big Joe & the Joetisserie and even the DoJoe. I've had the Big Joe for a year and don't like anything I cook in it. It's not the cooker's fault. It performs flawlessly. I guess I just don't like smoked foods. Wish I'd thought of that before. Anyone have any advice about coals (I use K-J) or recipes worth a try before I sell or donate it? Thanks

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello kftell, same here, honestly neither my wife nor I care much for smoked food. However we both love the food I cook  on my egg. I really never add smoking wood even on brisket, ribs, and pork butt cooks at 275 dgs ,which are the only low and slow cooks I do. The lion share of my cooking is done between 350 and 425. At those temps, using mostly Royal Oak, Fogo, or Jealous Devil lump, I don,t get much of a smoke profile or taste on the food I cook. Tell us a bit about how you set up your fire and cook and maybe we can give some tips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't give up on the kamado yet. My family is not particularly fond of smoke either. Like Keeper most of what I cook is between 325 and 425. At the higher temps there is less smoke. Also give the grill a little more time to settle in at the higher temp (if you are not already). Use a good quality lump charcoal. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you saying you don’t like smoke flavor or you don’t like meat cooked over charcoal?  If you don’t like smoke flavor then try what others have said, just cook over charcoal.  If the issue is really that you don’t like food cooked over charcoal then try a ceramic half moon deflector between the coals and the cooking surface and or a milder charcoal such as Rockwood or the coconut charcoal mentioned above.  This will make for a mild but still present flavor.  Also make sure your charcoal has been lit for a while so it is outputting near clear smoke.  I actually wait 30 minutes after my grill reaches cooking temp around 400 degrees.  If the results are not to your liking, maybe charcoal is not for you.   I do remember posting here that I did not like the food coming off my grill.  With the suggestions I got here and some practice, I like my kamado grilled meat now.  I do simple cooks, burgers and steaks.  Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have smoked things in my Joe from nuts to pulled pork, when I wanted some smoke flavor,  I have baked things in the same Joe, from cookies, pies, cornbread and cobbler, all without any smoke flavor.  The Japanese originated this idea and they are not known for heavy smoke flavors in their food.  Buying extruded coconut charcoal will be expensive, but will almost guarantee no smoke. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KFTELL It Is not dumb, it's just part of the learning curve. The first time I did chicken on my Classic II it came out too smoky for us (we don't like smoked poultry) I changed brands of charcoal and the smoky flavor went away. What brand of charcoal are you using? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Quality fuel is #1  2) Do NOT close down your "top vent" before your bottom vent.  If done, it will "drop" the exhaust back down on your food and drop nasty flavors (soot and waste exhaust).  Start your cooker without food inside and wait until your fuel (charcoal) is up to heat and has burnt off some of the "uncarbonized" fuel.   Keep at it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you not like smoked food from restaurants? Is it smoked food in general or just the things you make?

 

Quality lump will help. Cheap lump is far more likely to contain incompletely converted wood which will generate smoke flavors.

 

Preheat the kamado (hold temperature) until the exhaust is clear or thin blue. Honestly everyone should be doing this but if you're using good lump and no wood you'll be getting the least amount of smoke flavor. If you aren't doing this now it might explain why you don't like your food; putting meat on too early results in bitter creosote flavors.

 

Avoid low temperature cooks. You can achieve much cleaner smoke over 400F than you can under 300F.

 

Some ideas for using a Kamado without smoke include high temperature steaks, burgers, sausages, etc. You may want to use a drip pan (empty) to prevent grease from dripping into the firebox if you don't like fat smoke either, which is very different in taste than wood smoke. I like to leave the top open and get the fire raging hot to use as a wok burner around 800F. High temp pizzas are also a strength of a Kamado with no smoke flavor due to the super high temps required.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you somehow rig up a gas burner in there? Those Vision Kamados have a optional gas burner set up, maybe you could make that work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, make sure your drip trays (if you have them) are properly clean before you cook. Otherwise you will get old grease from past cooks smoking up your food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...