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Poultry problems on new Kamado Joe Classic


Selli
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I rarely do anything fancy other than dry it well, coat with olive oil/seasoning etc.

 

I never cook BELOW 400 degrees.  Just seems a waste of time to me TBH.  I don't understand theory behind cooking at lower temps longer for poultry.  Always comes out crispy and well rendered at 400+.

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@Selli

 

I have a couple tips for you that will fix your chicken problems.  First of all, your chicken must be completely DRY before you put it on your grill.  Getting all the moisture off the skin is critical.  I recommend drying the outside of the bird as much as possible with paper towels and then put it back in the fridge for an hour or two on a rack to dry it out even more.  

 

Preheat your grill to 450°F.  Give it plenty of time to preheat adequately.  Pull your chicken from the fridge and smear a very thin coat of oil on the skin... very thin... and then season it however you like.  Put it on the grill and cook it until the DEEP part of the breast hits about 150°F.  Don't worry about the temp of the leg and thighs.  They can handle higher temps without any issues. 

 

The problem with Kamado is that they retain moisture too well and that is detrimental to browning poultry or ANYTHING for that matter.  Kamados simply do NOT brown well because of this phenomenon.  You have to help the process.  Do not use drip pans or water pans during the cook.  

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26 minutes ago, John Setzler said:

@Selli

 

I have a couple tips for you that will fix your chicken problems.  First of all, your chicken must be completely DRY before you put it on your grill.  Getting all the moisture off the skin is critical.  I recommend drying the outside of the bird as much as possible with paper towels and then put it back in the fridge for an hour or two on a rack to dry it out even more.  

 

Preheat your grill to 450°F.  Give it plenty of time to preheat adequately.  Pull your chicken from the fridge and smear a very thin coat of oil on the skin... very thin... and then season it however you like.  Put it on the grill and cook it until the DEEP part of the breast hits about 150°F.  Don't worry about the temp of the leg and thighs.  They can handle higher temps without any issues. 

 

The problem with Kamado is that they retain moisture too well and that is detrimental to browning poultry or ANYTHING for that matter.  Kamados simply do NOT brown well because of this phenomenon.  You have to help the process.  Do not use drip pans or water pans during the cook.  

I understand the water part, but why no drip pan? It keeps my deflectors much cleaner. And being above the deflectors it shouldn't shield any heat.

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I've always used a drip pan with no issues for crispiness - the higher heat and airflow is the key I believe...I do not like the taste of poultry fat burning and also like to keep things cleaner as well.  Also want to keep the drip pan to a minimal size.  I use a dry pan with some foil to trap all the fat.  IMPORTANT - like you mentioned, you have to keep the pan raised up HIGH above the coals - up on a higher racks for example.  If you put a deflector/drip pan too low in a kamado and still try hit high temperatures, you create a VERY high temperature firebox as much of the heat is trapped below - i.e. cracks/damage are a possibility.

 

2 hours ago, A.O. said:

More time to collect that nice smokey flavor.

 

Yeah...not a fan of "smoked" poultry as a main course.  We prefer a nice, clean cook when cooking a main - just a hint of grill.   I love smoked fish, smoked turkey, smoked chicken etc...but as a snack etc. 

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19 minutes ago, SmallBBQr said:

Yeah...not a fan of "smoked" poultry as a main course.  We prefer a nice, clean cook when cooking a main - just a hint of grill.   I love smoked fish, smoked turkey, smoked chicken etc...but as a snack etc. 

Well you are in luck then, it is not smoked poultry, it's basically oven roasted poultry with a bit of a smoked flavor ....  Mmmm, everybody loves it!

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1 hour ago, A.O. said:

I understand the water part, but why no drip pan? It keeps my deflectors much cleaner. And being above the deflectors it shouldn't shield any heat.

 

It also collects moisture drippings from the chicken and they don't evaporate off as quickly and it keeps the humidity up inside the grill.  If you are concerned about heat deflectors being clean, wrap them in foil.  That's an issue I have never bothered with myself.  I brush the crud off my heat deflectors with the same wire brush I clean the grill with and I flip the deflectors so the dirty side goes towards the fire each cook.  No issues of any kind with that.

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While I tend to be a clean freak, I do not overly stress on getting the deflectors filthy and flipping them for the next cook. UNLESS that cook is a low and slow. I do find that that crud on the bottom of the deflector isn't going to burn off quickly and negatively affects lower temp cooks by putting out off odors...

 

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