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4garylee

Temperature Control by Vision Company Owner

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I gave Vision and call this week and talked about temp control and they provided this information below that was created I was told by Bruce (i do believe) the owner of Vision Grill.

The “key” to controlling temperature is being in control of your fire and it not being in control of you. This is achieved by regulating the oxygen/draft

I will share with you how to “be in control” of your temperature and then share steps for smoking and grilling/roasting which are two things you indicated you were interested in.

KEEPING FIRE IN CONTROL

Step #1: Fill bowl to just below the holes in the fire bowl. If you have unburnt lump charcoal stir with the lighter to knock ash into ash drawer and visually confirm the charcoal grate holes are not blocked (this will restrict air flow)

Step #2: Insert electric starter and plug in. Have top dome open to accelerate lighting

Step #3: After 8-10 minutes you should see charcoal emberring and possibly flames lapping up

Step #4: Remove electric starter and put in safe place. Close dome and have all vents open. Don’t need smoker knobs open and I will comment on that later.

Step #5: When temperature gauge reaches 200 degrees shut top vent and large dial to “2” flames. After 2-3 minutes temperature should settle between 200 – 220 degrees and only approx. ¼ of the charcoal should be lite

Step #6: You are now in control and to increase temperature you would open the top vent to reintroduce draft which will “fan” the fire. To bring temperature down you would shut ALL vents, top & bottom, to cut off oxygen and temp should start to fall 50 degrees every 3-5 minutes. If you want to hold temperature you would have the top vent shut and bottom vent at “2” flames. If you want to bring your temperature down more quickly you can “burp” your Vision Grill by opening the dome to let hot air out and then shut.

Smoking – Brisket, chicken (whole), ribs, pork shoulder (pulled pork) – 220-225 low and slow

Step #1: Follow Steps #1-#5 above

Step #2: Place heat deflector stone in the metal bracket to create a convection environment and to not burn the meat during the low and slow process

Step #3: At 215 degrees open the top and bottom smoker knob. The temperature should settle around 215 – 225 degrees and then hold for up to 14 hours on a ½ bowl of charcoal. Please keep in mind that lump charcoal is not uniform so if the temperature drifts past 225 with both smoker knobs open you will want to shut the top knob

Step #4: To extend the benefits of low and slow in creating a succulent meat you will want to keep the exterior moist/cool as long as possible by “mopping” or spraying with a liquid of choice. I often use apple cider but you can experiment

Grilling/Roasting - Chicken (whole), pieces, pork chops, salmon, kabobs, veggies, etc.

Step #1: Follow Steps #1 - #5 above

Step #2: If Roasting, place heat deflector in the metal bracket, if Grilling you will want direct heat so you will not use the stone

Step #3: At this point you should be around 200 – 220 degrees with top vent shut and bottom dial at “2” flames

Step #4: If roasting, open top vent and allow temp to rise to approximately 295-295. When this temp is achieved shut top vent and temp should settle between 300-315 degrees. Place food on grill and shut dome (top vent still shut) and allow the food to roast. You may want to turn periodically but should not have to with the stone in place as it creates a convection environment.

If Grilling follow Step #4 but without the stone in place.

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The essence of the above post is you've got to know the response curve of your kamado. Spend an afternoon learning how to hit 225, 250, 275, 300, 325, 350, 375, 400, 425, & 450. These are the most common temps you'll be using. Keep notes as to vent settings.

Like everything else in life, mastery requires practice. Spend an afternoon mastering your kamado and you'll never regret it.

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Thanks for the post. This sounds like sound advice. I would think Bruce, the owner or CEO, would have a vested interest in the best practicing procedures of his grill. I would imagine that he's had extensive sit-downs with the the designers and engineers, who have done countless testing on a variety of prototype models before placing models into production.

Outside of a couple of my own little favorite techniques ( I generally fill charcoal to the holes or a little above.), I'll follow his advice for future cooks.

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That is great advivce for their new grill, but I would like to have instructions for the older pro model. That is the only complaint I have with Vision. Their starter grill instructuions were woefully inadequate.

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Just to clarify, do most folks leave the kamado open when lighting the coals? I've been using the sawdust camping sticks to light my coals, and I've been doing it with the dome closed, but all vents bottom and top wide open, then start closing them as the temp rises..

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Just to clarify, do most folks leave the kamado open when lighting the coals? I've been using the sawdust camping sticks to light my coals, and I've been doing it with the dome closed, but all vents bottom and top wide open, then start closing them as the temp rises..

And how has that been working for you? If it works for you and you're satisfied, keep after it!

As for me. I leave the dome up until my fire is lit, then I lower the dome and begin adjusting the vents based on the temp I'm looking to hit.

Here's to nothing but great cooks and even better memories with family and friends!

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And how has that been working for you? If it works for you and you're satisfied, keep after it!

As for me. I leave the dome up until my fire is lit, then I lower the dome and begin adjusting the vents based on the temp I'm looking to hit.

Here's to nothing but great cooks and even better memories with family and friends!

I do this same

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So let me see if I have this right. When I get the temp to the area I would like I should close the top vent on my Classic? How will that effect the smoke? I have been getting it to the temp I wish then I close the top and bottom vents to the number I want and cook that way. I ask cause it has been such a chore for me to keep my temp to hold steady. I get so frustrated when I hear all these posts about you guys getting your temp to hold steady and mine constantly fluctuates. Thanks for all of the feedback.

BTW, if I ordered the professional top vent would that fit on the classic and would that make any difference to my cooks.

Happy Father's day to you all.

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I just followed these exact

Methods, and I'm holding bang on for 8 racks of ribs, if you read in that post the top vent creates draft. By closing it off it doesn't feed the fire excessively and draw the fire up through the coals.

For smoking you open the small smoking vent on the top (vision pro C) which will keep the burn low and slow.

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This method works best for me on both my Vision Pro S and my Primo XL:

I stack the lump appropriate for the cook I intend, i.e., volcano for longer cooks, and mix in whatever smoking wood I'm using.

I start the fire w/ half a weber cube in the crater and leave the lid open, standing right there the entire time, until the fire has ignited a small amount of lump. This usually takes about 5 minutes. Remember--NEVER walk away from a kamado with an open lid; the results can be literally disastrous

When the lump has caught, close the lid, and open the bottom and top vents 100%. Monitor your temperatures as they rise until you get to within 40* of your target temp. (Some people say within 25*, but I prefer a really slow ramp-up).

The bottom vent I use for general temp control. The top vent I use for fine adjustment. The more I use my kamados, the more I learn predictable settings, but never losing track of the fact that every cook is different, and every fire is different.

When your temp has stabilized @ target for about 20-30 minutes, open the lid carefully and start cooking, monitoring, now and then as you go.

I know this is pretty rudimentary, but it has worked well for me.

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So let me see if I have this right. When I get the temp to the area I would like I should close the top vent on my Classic? How will that effect the smoke? I have been getting it to the temp I wish then I close the top and bottom vents to the number I want and cook that way. I ask cause it has been such a chore for me to keep my temp to hold steady. I get so frustrated when I hear all these posts about you guys getting your temp to hold steady and mine constantly fluctuates. Thanks for all of the feedback.

BTW, if I ordered the professional top vent would that fit on the classic and would that make any difference to my cooks.

Happy Father's day to you all.

I dont know if it will help or not with temp but I like the look of the cast-iron top vent so I emailed Vision. They will sell the cast-iron top vent for $35.69 + $15.00 for shipping anywhere in the continental US. I have a classic myself and stated that in my email so I am assuming they are interchangeable. They also said they are sold out and it will be 2 to 3 weeks before they have any in stock.

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I dont know if it will help or not with temp but I like the look of the cast-iron top vent so I emailed Vision. They will sell the cast-iron top vent for $35.69 + $15.00 for shipping anywhere in the continental US. I have a classic myself and stated that in my email so I am assuming they are interchangeable. They also said they are sold out and it will be 2 to 3 weeks before they have any in stock.

I would love if the different upper vent are interchangeable. I would purchase a pro c series to use the fine adjustment. Haven't been cooking long enough on stock to know if it would work out.

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