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Time data sheet for Hot and Fast Ribs


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When I cook I normally target a "finish" time so regular meal planning can take place.  Just "cook 'til' it's ready" is fine if you want "wait 'til it's ready" to eat.  SWMBO doesn't like that schedule, so here is my work-back schedule for hot and fast ribs.

 

First some editorial comments.  Low and slow is not the strong point of Kamado cooking IMHO.  Does it work?  Yep.  Is it always the best method?  Nope, not for me.  A Kamado is an air-limiting cooker and the smoke profile does NOT develop the same way stick-fired smokers work.  Stick-fired large capacity smokers move a TON of air.  A TON.  No Kamado is going to do that and also maintain low heat.  If you throttle down a Kamado to get the same low heat, you aren't going to get the same quality smoke.  That has been my observation, so go ahead and throw rocks if you differ. :)

 

Print the attached sheet and starting from the bottom (line 5) work your way back in time to when you need to put the ribs on.  I spritz mine with 50/50 apple juice and water but that is up to you.

 

I have found that at 300°F this 3 hour schedule works like a champ, at least for me.

 

Here's my last cook with the temperature managed by my HeaterMeter.  Don't pay any attention to the Probe 1 and Probe 2 lines, I was messing about checking other stuff.  The HeaterMeter ran the KJ just fine and you can see the quick recovery after the lid openings.

 

Tom

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Hey, @T_om, I didn't see any attachments on your post. 

 

I'll go a bit of a different angle on it - ribs can get done in a range of temps from about 200 to about 350F, with some major adjustments in time and method.  I've not figured out my "best" method, but would be interested in trying more, including yours, if you include the details :-D

 

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I agree with @T_om that the "Kamado" and "Smoker" cooking processes are completely different.  Both of them are effectively built on the use of hot air as the means of cooking.  But Kamado is effectively a convection oven, circulating and recirculating a deliberately-very-limited amount of air in a tightly-enclosed insulated chamber which also contains the fire.  Whereas a true smoker uses a hot blast of smoke-filled air coming from a firebox that is entirely separated from the cooking chamber. 

 

You can achieve what is to many people a very satisfactory "smoked effect" in a Kamado, but it is not at all the same in terms of physical process.  So, if this matters to your taste buds, you need two grills.

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One more question:  For all of my cooking, I rely on an external-reading thermometer probe.  But I haven't found a good way to place the probe when cooking ribs.  Consequently, my final results "have been 'mixed.'"  (Which does not happen in other cooks, such as steak or roast or chops.) Am I overlooking something?  I think that the probe is "reading the fire" more than "the meat."

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One more question:  For all of my cooking, I rely on an external-reading thermometer probe.  But I haven't found a good way to place the probe when cooking ribs.  Consequently, my final results "have been 'mixed.'"  (Which does not happen in other cooks, such as steak or roast or chops.) Am I overlooking something?  I think that the probe is "reading the fire" more than "the meat."

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One more question:  For all of my cooking, I rely on an external-reading thermometer probe.  But I haven't found a good way to place the probe when cooking ribs.  Consequently, my final results "have been 'mixed.'"  (Which does not happen in other cooks, such as steak or roast or chops.) Am I overlooking something?  I think that the probe is "reading the fire" more than "the meat."

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On 11/23/2022 at 9:22 AM, MikeRobinson said:

But I haven't found a good way to place the probe when cooking ribs. 

Yeah, ribs are trickier than most.  I've found that if I'm careful about putting the probe in the thickest part of the rib, and half-way between two of the ribs, and away from any other bones, I sometimes get OK results.  Sometimes I'll have to insert it more than once, when I see the meat temp going up faster than I think it should. 

 

But you can also just go by time and flex.  I'm only concerned about the meat temp for ribs if I'm going to be away from the grill for an extended amount of time (I'm still traumatized from the gasser I used that required constant monitoring).

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