Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Agreed, getting the spray glue on the gasket would be easy. I think it would be a big mess after I have a long flimsy thing covered in really sticky glue that im trying to maneuver on to the grill without it getting on me or the side of the grill. Also, I have nobody to help me. Maybe im crazy. Thinking about it now I dont think the rtv would stick to the gasket very well. I wonder if there is a type of tube glue that can be used....

ah, I see your point. a second pair of hands would be helpful, but by yourself it would be tricky.

the pre-glued stuff comes with a paper backing you can peel off as you apply it, and that also makes it easier because you can cut it after application rather than before.

Invite a buddy over for a beer. and maybe a steak. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe im crazy. Thinking about it now I dont think the rtv would stick to the gasket very well. I wonder if there is a type of tube glue that can be used....

unfortunately, this isn't something that lends itself well to experimentation.

Before I bought the akorn, I had a home made terra-cotta pot smoker that I applied a BGE gasket just like yours to and I tried a half dozen different kinds of glue trying to get it to work. The only thing I found that worked was an epoxy that I had to premix and apply with a stick, letting it almost dry before putting the gasket on about 6 inches at a time - a real pain. All the others just wouldn't stick long enough to set - it kept peeling up - though that could be because I was applying to porous ceramic.

Maybe contact cement - the stuff they use to apply linoleum to wood? apply it to both surfaces and let it dry before applying. the gasket might need a few coats to get a good contact surface. Don't miss, because once it makes contact, it's stuck for good.

It's a thought. But for the cost of the adhesive, you're almost to where you could buy the pre-glued gasket.

hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The gasket package says to use 3m super 77 but thats a spray glue which would be a pain in the butt imo.

I added the white BGE gasket with the copper RTV in June. The combo works great & since then I've done 24+ pizza cooks @ 450* along with plenty of steaks.

I used every last drop in the RTV tube to seal the grill & ash pan to the felt. Plus you have to use lots of tape (blue painter's is what I used) to hold in place the felt while the RTV cures. Cure time is 24 hours. Because the painter's tape is all over the place you have a hard time cleaning up any excess RTV.

Next time I'll get the pre-glued felt or the 3M Super 77 or contact cement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i already got some 3M Super 77 so i think i'll go ahead and try it first. to make it less tricky(by myself) i'm thinking of maybe only putting it on in pieces that are 12 to 18 inches rather than gluing up one long piece and dealing with that. i figure if this doesnt work very well at least i wont have to scrape rtv off just to try another method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My fully sealed Akorn took over 4 hours to cool from 400 degrees, that includes opening the vent for short periods to let the heat out. What could be wrong? I didn't seal the top vent, and as far as I know the ash pan isn't cracked. It's never taken that long to cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My fully sealed Akorn took over 4 hours to cool from 400 degrees, that includes opening the vent for short periods to let the heat out. What could be wrong? I didn't seal the top vent, and as far as I know the ash pan isn't cracked. It's never taken that long to cool.

It is possible that some times more charcoal gets lit.

Also you might take a look inside of the vent to see if it is still glowing when you open the top vent after say 20 minutes. If it is still glowing I would start looking for leak in the bottom somewhere. I had to redo the felt behind the slide.

Lately i have taken to opening the whole top wide open until one coal just starts glowing and close it. i find this cools it down faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My fully sealed Akorn took over 4 hours to cool from 400 degrees, that includes opening the vent for short periods to let the heat out. What could be wrong? I didn't seal the top vent, and as far as I know the ash pan isn't cracked. It's never taken that long to cool.

I just red what you said. When you open the vent to let the heat out do you think it creates a vacuum inside your smoker? When the hot air goes out something has to replace the air that left and that is usually going to be fresh Oxegyn. I would close it down and leave it closed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After I close the vents I think the coals are snuffed out pretty quickly. I have been opening the lid after a short period of time and I think it does help to cool it down quicker. I could see 4 hours if I just left it closed, but I am taking a chance that the coals will fire back up it just has not been my experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just red your original post again. Why open the vents to let the hot air out? When you do that fresh oxegynated air must replace the air that left or you would have a vacuum. The fresh air feeds the fire and builds the heat back up. Why not close all vents and leave them closed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@newpower If opening the lid does not stoke the fire why not leave the lid open? If the fire is out there can not be a faster way to cool it down.

Sorry about the double post guys. I updated my Tapatalk and it is not working well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My official GUESS is if left open the fire may come back and probably will. I think letting out the hot air cools it but does not introduce enough oxygen to restart the fire. But quite honestly I have been known to be full of it!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My fully sealed Akorn took over 4 hours to cool from 400 degrees, that includes opening the vent for short periods to let the heat out. What could be wrong? I didn't seal the top vent, and as far as I know the ash pan isn't cracked. It's never taken that long to cool.

It is possible that some times more charcoal gets lit.

Also you might take a look inside of the vent to see if it is still glowing when you open the top vent after say 20 minutes. If it is still glowing I would start looking for leak in the bottom somewhere. I had to redo the felt behind the slide.

Lately i have taken to opening the whole top wide open until one coal just starts glowing and close it. i find this cools it down faster.

I think this is the case, hopefully. I am going to go through my grill tomorrow and clean it well and check for leaky gaskets also. However I lit my grill in a different way also, I wadded newspaper under a small pile of fresh lump and lit it, might have lit a lot more than usual as it actuallu would have large-ish flames when the.lid was open, not flare ups. I mean instead of just glowing coals it would have that clear fire going when I opened the lid.

Irvin, maybe you're right about opening the vent creating a vac, but since Marty recommended doing it my grill has generally shut down fast. Ill update tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By Tarnation
      Smoke rolls early in the morning for this rack of ribs and a prime brisket.  Binder is mustard, rub for the ribs is a Traeger rub I poached from dad, rub for the brisket is Thundering Longhorn beef rub. I'll keep you updated.



    • By Tarnation
      1 hour in to my first turkey on the Akorn.  I let it smoke @ 250 then upped the temperature to 325 to cook and crisp. More updates to come.

    • By Tarnation
      Prepped this little half butt for a work Halloween potluck last night, cooking it tonight.  Just a little teaser before I tucked in and put it to bed.

    • By Tarnation
      Here's my entry for October's PP challenge.  This is actually a double leftover.  I made sloppy joes using leftover pork smoked in my Akorn.  Since that's basically a pp sandwich that will not be my submission.  I decided a pp omelette was the ticket with a Carolina twist BBQ sauce and coleslaw.  It was scrumptious. Chopped Onions, red peppers, green peppers, yellow peppers and a 3 cheese blend rounded out the rest of the ingredients.




    • By Tarnation
      My sister gifted our mom and me a steak dinner for our birthdays this month.  Meaning she bought the steaks and I cooked them.  I used a mix of seasoning salts, Lawry's, garlic salt, and something else my dad had in the cabinet to season them.  I wish I could have really let the seasoning salts do their job for awhile, but basically just let them come up to room temperature since they were purchased today and we were eating them tonight.  I low and slowed them on my Akorn for about an hour @250ish using my BBQube and Bluetooth temp monitor to get them to about 115-120 internal.  I then transferred them to some cast iron skillets with melted butter in them I had heated to 450-500 on my dad's gas burner and seared them for 1 minute per side.  Overall fantastic results. I wanted a good medium/medium-rare for mine and I think I got it dead on.  Money shots provided.



×
×
  • Create New...