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I just purchased an Akorn from Lowes. I see pics and references of the baffles having fractional numbers. Mine only goes down to 1 and does't have the .25 increments?  Are these different models? Add ons?

 

Second question

How do you clean a seasoned cast Iron Grate?  I'm accutomed to cleaning my regular grills with a wire brush but concerned that's probably not right??

 

Thanks

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Mine doesn't have it, but the middle of the screw between closed and 1 is about half way.  I like using the screw as a marker.

I agree. I usually have mine set on about the middle of the screw when doing a low and slow cook.

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  • 3 weeks later...

wish my  lid didn't go back so far..im not very tall and it seems to go back so far its not an easy reach for the hancle..any ideas  how to adjust/modify the hinge  t keep it slightly ahead?

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  • 2 months later...

Here's another quick addition to the Pizza Pan diffuser section. 

 

super easy to do. Take the standard cheapie 16 inch pizza pan from walmart - you want to make a flat cut across with a length of 12"  -- then measure up 6.5" from that cut, and make another straight across cut. 

 
20160725_173717_zpseemjep2g.jpg
 
20160725_174618_zpsdmvc0vdl.jpg
 
20160725_174703_zpsnuw4acwn.jpg

 

I tried (somewhat successfully) of doing a dual-zone cook on Sunday with a half-sheet diffuser. Was doing chicken quarters. 4 mins a side on the direct, then I usually aim for about 1.5 hours on indirect. 

 

Well, needless to say, my temps where a little too high for the indirect side. Not that it was bad, but it cooked a little quicker than I wanted (about 1/2 the time.)

 

So, bust out the grinder and let's make a coal-separation plate (I just load my acorn with lump.)

 

You can tell from the photos that you can get an easy 125 to 150 degree grate temperature difference with the plate buried in the coals. (Ok ok I can't get it to use the photos from my google drive.... just believe me.)

 

Direct coal temperature above 600 degrees, and less than 150 degrees on the unlit side. 

 

The only thing you MUST BE SURE OF is to "Burn In" the separation plate - I lit a fire on both sides and brought it up to afterburner temp to burn off the coating on the pan before using it to cook. 

 

On first use, I had a couple coals on the unlit side light up, but the bottom may not be perfectly flat and some fire-creep under the separation plate is assumed. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I've enjoyed my Kamado Akorn for several years.  Bought it at a great price in BJs Warehouse.

Even though I've always used my weather cover, water must have gotten into the ash pan.  It's rusted pretty badly.  I'm looking for a replacement ash pan.

I'm checking with Char Griller to see if their ash pan would work.

Do you have any other sources for replacement parts?

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Someone asked about cleaning? 

 

FIRE IT UP

 

20160729_1940021_zpswt6xbj11.jpg

 

Actually this is a testament to the "Lava Lock" gasket material from Amazon. I had this bad boy up WELL ABOVE the 700 degrees on the built in thermometer. in fact, it was so hot it melted the wire from the temp probe you can see in the middle. Not a single issue with any of the gaskets. 

 

I couldn't get close enough to IR gun the cast iron grate, but I think glowing red hot is hot enough. 

 

Another way I usually clean mine (I do NOT have porcelain coated grates, FYI) is to get it to around 450 or so and wipe it down with a water soaked rag. 

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  • 3 months later...

Since the first post still shows a need for air vent sealing, I'll chime in with how I fixed mine. The damper was tight enough that it didn't fall out, but that's about it. Not precise at all. I only had to take off one screw that keeps the damper from leaving the intake vent completely. IMG_5193.JPG

Then I used a wire brush and degreaser to clean off the back enough that the lava lock gasket material could adhere. I'm sure any felt gasket material would work fine; Amazon just had that brand on sale last week. Cutting right down the middle of the strip sized it almost perfectly. There's an angle near the damper handle, so I held the gasket up to it and used a sharpie to mark the cut lines. The gasket cuts ok with sharp scissors if it isn't partially stuck, but you definitely want to do all cuts before removing the backing. IMG_5199.JPGIMG_5200.JPG

After that it's just take your time and line the edges of the damper, super easy.IMG_5202.JPG

The only somewhat tricky part is getting the right thickness. With gasket material it is WAY to thick to move on the intake vent. The trick is to hold down one corner, then rub your thumb the opposite direction. Since it's made of felt, the felt will naturally come apart. Go slow and after a few layers, it'll be just the right thickness. IMG_5203.JPG

Slide it in the opposite of how it came out, put the only screw back in, and you're ready for grilling! I'd describe the new feeling as "intentional." The damper doesn't move by accident, and more importantly it stays put with an airtight seal. Hope this helps somebody! Goodness knows I've stolen enough good ideas from here, about time I contribute one. 

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18 hours ago, MrScootyPuffSr said:

Since the first post still shows a need for air vent sealing, I'll chime in with how I fixed mine. The damper was tight enough that it didn't fall out, but that's about it. Not precise at all. I only had to take off one screw that keeps the damper from leaving the intake vent completely. IMG_5193.JPG

Then I used a wire brush and degreaser to clean off the back enough that the lava lock gasket material could adhere. I'm sure any felt gasket material would work fine; Amazon just had that brand on sale last week. Cutting right down the middle of the strip sized it almost perfectly. There's an angle near the damper handle, so I held the gasket up to it and used a sharpie to mark the cut lines. The gasket cuts ok with sharp scissors if it isn't partially stuck, but you definitely want to do all cuts before removing the backing. IMG_5199.JPGIMG_5200.JPG

After that it's just take your time and line the edges of the damper, super easy.IMG_5202.JPG

The only somewhat tricky part is getting the right thickness. With gasket material it is WAY to thick to move on the intake vent. The trick is to hold down one corner, then rub your thumb the opposite direction. Since it's made of felt, the felt will naturally come apart. Go slow and after a few layers, it'll be just the right thickness. IMG_5203.JPG

Slide it in the opposite of how it came out, put the only screw back in, and you're ready for grilling! I'd describe the new feeling as "intentional." The damper doesn't move by accident, and more importantly it stays put with an airtight seal. Hope this helps somebody! Goodness knows I've stolen enough good ideas from here, about time I contribute one. 

LOL---"The damper was tight enough that it didn't fall out, but that's about it."

Sounds like you the same one that I had. Just sliding the vent would flop the slide around and change the amount of seal the air vent made. Close it down slightly and the temp could go up instead. Getting the slide to what you have is the single biggest thing i ever did that made the Akorn  to use your word "intentional" when I adjusted it from the bottom.

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On 11/13/2016 at 3:48 PM, MrScootyPuffSr said:

Isn't it amazing how the Akorn manufacturers do such a great job on 95% of the grill, then get to a crucial link in the chain and just go, "...meh." At least it's not a difficult fix! Besides, if they made it too good out of the box, the masses would realize how awesome it is and prices would skyrocket!

Actually I have two Akorns that have not been modded in any way and do not need to be. They came just fine out of the box and have been trouble free. I think a lot of folks are busy fixing a problem that does not exist because they have read OLD posts saying it does. Akorn fixed the problem several years ago.

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23 hours ago, robertyb said:

Actually I have two Akorns that have not been modded in any way and do not need to be. They came just fine out of the box and have been trouble free. I think a lot of folks are busy fixing a problem that does not exist because they have read OLD posts saying it does. Akorn fixed the problem several years ago.

That's great that your two worked out of the box. Hopefully all new ones work perfectly as I don't wish frustration on anyone breaking into the hobby. Mine didn't. Maybe I got old stock from several years ago. Maybe my pictures will help somebody else who got old stock. At any rate, I love cooking on it and think it's a great grill. 

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  • 1 month later...
On 7/29/2016 at 11:45 AM, bnovak282 said:

Here's another quick addition to the Pizza Pan diffuser section. 

 

super easy to do. Take the standard cheapie 16 inch pizza pan from walmart - you want to make a flat cut across with a length of 12"  -- then measure up 6.5" from that cut, and make another straight across cut. 

 
20160725_173717_zpseemjep2g.jpg
 
20160725_174618_zpsdmvc0vdl.jpg
 
20160725_174703_zpsnuw4acwn.jpg

 

I tried (somewhat successfully) of doing a dual-zone cook on Sunday with a half-sheet diffuser. Was doing chicken quarters. 4 mins a side on the direct, then I usually aim for about 1.5 hours on indirect. 

 

Well, needless to say, my temps where a little too high for the indirect side. Not that it was bad, but it cooked a little quicker than I wanted (about 1/2 the time.)

 

So, bust out the grinder and let's make a coal-separation plate (I just load my acorn with lump.)

 

You can tell from the photos that you can get an easy 125 to 150 degree grate temperature difference with the plate buried in the coals. (Ok ok I can't get it to use the photos from my google drive.... just believe me.)

 

Direct coal temperature above 600 degrees, and less than 150 degrees on the unlit side. 

 

The only thing you MUST BE SURE OF is to "Burn In" the separation plate - I lit a fire on both sides and brought it up to afterburner temp to burn off the coating on the pan before using it to cook. 

 

On first use, I had a couple coals on the unlit side light up, but the bottom may not be perfectly flat and some fire-creep under the separation plate is assumed. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Could I do separation with my double colander setup and just have the wood chips sit outside of the colanders?

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