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bhall7

Can't control temps on Akorn

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I couldn't agree more. The top vent allows only a few sq in of airflow while the open lid allows a few sq ft. Because you need more fuel than initially needed to provide heat over an extended period of time the key to temp control is airflow.

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Something to think about, in kamado cooking, the temp of the grill itself is just as important as the temp of the fire. When going for a lo/slo, you have to heat both the air and the grill, the grill obviously taking longer. Have patience at first, get your temps under control, and you'll get the hang of it.

I do like controllers, they take a lot of guesswork out of the equation, and allowed me to have confidence in my cooking. I have learned how to control my fires manually, with a little less frustration, I think.

Robert

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Do not give up you have a great cooker and the coolest version of it. (cart) You will get it..

What ICD said. You got a great cooker. I've been through quite a few cookers in my life and I can say this Akorn thing is amazing. Plenty of top notch talent on the forum to help you through the learning curve. If you master the egg cooker you get a punch on your man card :D

Like someone mentioned above. If you can snuff it, you have no leak issues and that's a good thing.

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To answer your question on temp issues with the WSM's. Yes on the 22" not so much for the 18". I couldn't keep the 22 under 330...sold it. The 18 has a nice sweet spot but the CGK are spot on you just need to keep working it.

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CeramicChef, sorry I thought he tried to control his temps and could not so i made some suggestions. I am not necessarily advocating he gets a PID. I can control my temps very well but I don't want to baby sit my cooks for 10+ hours (sometimes overnight) so I use the Auber because i choose to use it.

EDIT: With all due respect - http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.p ... %20respect

Oops!

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Guys - can we agree to forget about using numbers? They are a meaningless measure. They are not used in BBQ anywhere except as a marketing gimmick. Heck, given the incredibly sloppy manufacturing tolerances of the Akorn, those numbers are simply and utterly useless and most times they get boonies in trouble. Why even bother? A '1' on your Akorn that's has been modified and remodified, sealed and reseated, has as much relevance to an out of the box new Akorn as a paper airplane has to a combat ready F-15!

Finally, flow is measured in CUBIC units, i.e. cubic inches or cubic feet, not in square units, i.e. square inches. Square inches or square feet in a measure of area. Air flow through a kamado should always be measured in cubic feet per unit time such as 15 cubic feet per minute. That flow can be measured across a vent opening of 5 square inches.

Here's to great cooks.

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To me when folks say bringing it up slow to me that means up to 40-45 minutes.. Once you get more experienced you can do it a little faster..

These days I'm ready to cook in about 10 minutes...

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Guys - can we agree to forget about using numbers? They are a meaningless measure. They are not used in BBQ anywhere except as a marketing gimmick. Heck, given the incredibly sloppy manufacturing tolerances of the Akorn, those numbers are simply and utterly useless and most times they get boonies in trouble. Why even bother? A '1' on your Akorn that's has been modified and remodified, sealed and reseated, has as much relevance to an out of the box new Akorn as a paper airplane has to a combat ready F-15!

Finally, flow is measured in CUBIC units, i.e. cubic inches or cubic feet, not in square units, i.e. square inches. Square inches or square feet in a measure of area. Air flow through a kamado should always be measured in cubic feet per unit time such as 15 cubic feet per minute. That flow can be measured across a vent opening of 5 square inches.

Here's to great cooks.

With all due respect ( :lol: sorry, I had to :lol: ) the numbers people discuss on the board helped me understand where people were moving the vents to get different temperatures. In other words, it gave me a reference point as to where I should be setting the vents. As a newbie to the Akorn, it really helped me quickly get control of temperatures. If I hadn't I read "when it hits 150 cut it back to 2 & 2" I probably would have cut it too far back (or not far enough!).

To your point, yeah, there are so many things that will influence the temperatures that there are no 'factory settings' to get you ZZZ temperature. Heck, on my first rib cook the grill was at 97 degrees BEFORE lighting anything because it was so hot outside. But I made notes, took pictures and was able to dial it in to where I wanted it to be. What shocked me the most was how just minor, minor changes to either vent had serious impact on the temps. Obviously, I'm still learning. And the vent settings today for 250 degrees probably will be quite different to get that same temperature in December. But the numbers help me visualize around where I need to be....

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I probably will regret this ....

Numbers are for people who haven't or won't spent time learning about their specific kamado and its idiosyncrasies. Numbers are a crutch. You don't see numbers on a Komodo Kamodo, BGE, or Primo. They wouldn't think of insulting their customer base with numbers. You never see a competition cooker with numbers. You never hear any competition chef refer to vent numbers. In fact, you don't even hear restaurant chefs refer to numbers ... they refer to medium high or medium low or low heat.

Your post skewers you. You talk about all the things that affect temperature and then you start defending numbers as something that helps! You simply can't be serious.

You need numbers as much as Dumbo needed that feather to fly! Invest the time you need to invest with your kamado so that you can do what needs to be done! Try learning the craft of cooking on a kamado instead of trying to reduce this to a set of mere numbers.

If numbers were so important, why do you suppose that the scale is so gross in its gradations? How come there isn't a stop for 1.625 or 0.125 and the manufacturer refer to those and other numbers in the manual? I'll tell you why ... NUMBERS ARE MEANINGLESS! If the manufacturers have figured that out why can't you?

Okay, y'all can call all the names you want, and I'm certain you will, but sometimes the truth is just the plain truth. Shall we start with the letter "A"? Who wants 'arrogant'?

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If your vent has numbers and you use them that's fine, if your vent doesn't have numbers then that's fine too. just remember opinions are like arseholes, everyone has one ;-)

Have a great weekend everyone.

Kev

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C. C., Saying that you're arrogant is like saying the Pacific Ocean is a pond. If a person uses numbers to get a result, and it works, then thats what a person should do. Suggestions are one thing, but saying you don't NEED a certain thing, belittling someone and calling them names, a person doesn't NEED that either. There's no such thing as perfect, no such thing as the best grill, charcoal, technique, or anything else to do with cooking, what works is all that matters.

Often, the information you share is quite informative, but your rants on why a person is wrong for not doing things the way you do are maddening at the very least.

Robert

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I appreciate all of the helpful suggestions and guidance. I've been lurking here on this forum for a while, searching for help, and I have spent countless hours sitting in front of my Akorn and Maverick ET732, sweating, trying to get the temperatures right, and I guess this just isn't for me--shouldn't be this hard.

Last night, after struggling for several hours to maintain a consistent temp on my Akorn, we took the pork butt next door and threw it in my neighbor's BGE with a DigiQ DX2, and MAN, it smells good! I returned my Akorn to Home Depot this morning and they were cool about taking it back for a 100% full refund.

Now I'm thinking about if I want to get an offset smoker, electric smoker, or a WSM...Agh! (~$300-350 budget).

Sorry if I let y'all down...

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bhall, I've seen deals on ceramic grills from time to time, most recently at academy sports. Maybe if you found one of those, or similar, you might have better luck. I hate to see you have a bad experience with a kamado, so many of us just love them. Good grilling whatever you decide!

Robert

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Now I'm thinking about if I want to get an offset smoker, electric smoker, or a WSM...Agh! (~$300-350 budget).

Sorry if I let y'all down...

I think you made a mistake.. When I first started on my akorn I was frustrated as well.. I even remember I made a post on here once that "I was gonna load the firebox to the brim, throw on some lighter fluid and burn the POS to the ground"... Than things got better and over time more consistent and now am more than pleased..

I really love cooking on a stick burner but you better be ready to feed that thing a split every 45 minutes or so and if you use charcoal be prepared to buy a lot and play with vents.. There is a learning curve to managing a fire in a stickburner as well and you will find yourself shuffling with the vents as temp goes up and temp goes down till you know how to feed the beast. Additionally in your price range be prepared for some mods to even out temps across the grate.. When I have time and feel like kicking back with a 12 pk and feeding it I really enjoy it, but due to the ease of the Akorn I find myself firing it up about 90 percent of the time.

Electric, here is a wonderful read. :shock:http://amazingribs.com/BBQ_buyers_guide/smokers/electric_smokers.html

WSM has a cult following and from everything I hear is a wonderful smoker. But thats what it is, a smoker.. I have never cooked on one but what I have seen on the forums there is a learning curve to go with them as well, may not be for you.

From the Kamado to the WSM to the Offset they all have one thing in common fire and vents and thus all have a learning curve.

If I wanted a set it and forget it type cooker that is easy, its gonna leave you with either a propane cabinet smoker or a pellet pooper.

Here is a pellet pooper in your price range..

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0047WJFSU

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