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Serious BBQ by Adam Perry Lang - The Book


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John,

Thus far I have done two recipes from Adam Perry Langs serious barbecue. In both instances I felt like the amount of work that you put into the recipe definitely made for an awesome meal!

The first one was cider brined pork chops with apple jelly glaze page 40. The thing that I can say about these recipes that I like, is the fact that you have layers of flavors that change as you chew and swallow the food. Much like a fine complex wine which I love as well!!! The Brine gave a salty spicy sweet flavor with a slight hint of Apple, whereas the seasoning blend gave more of an Earthy flavor followed by the glaze which was sweet With a burst of Apple. I would recommend using very thick pork chops with this recipe so you have more time for basting before you reach the optimum 145° temperature that you're looking for to get a beautiful juicy chop! I started the cook over direct heat at about 350° using one chunk of applewood for a little smoke. Then I let the temperature rise to 450° and finished the porkchops up on the top grate of my acorn while basting furiously.

The second recipe used was honey glazed whole turkey breast. I modified this recipe slightly because the turkey was a honey brined turkey breast bone in from Wegmans. I skipped the injection used the seasoning blend glaze and finishing dressing. When I'm mixed up the glaze and tasted it I really believe I could've just drank it as is I loved the sweet vinegary flavor that the thyme and marjoram leaves totally set off. I believe the turkey breast would've been excellent just served at that point but the finishing dressing gave it more complexity with the lemony chives combination. I seared the skin on the top of the breast about four minutes over direct heat at 400°, before putting the smoking stone in place and finishing it indirectly bone side down. That is when I basted heavily. I changed the finishing temperature A

PL said to cook to 165 I went for 160 and then tented the breast with foil as it sat out on the cutting board absorbing some of the lemony chive goodness for about 10 minutes.

In conclusion, I can't wait to try other recipes from this book and as I do I will add to this post.

Cheers to great food,

Frank

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I got my copy just before vacation, also order his other book at the same time for  free shipping from Chapters.

Charred & Scruffed: Bold New Techniques for Explosive Flavor on and off the Grill

 

I started using his  flip/flip method on steaks at the lake and it seemed to work good on the gasser.

Last night I did some  rib steaks on the Vision  but was not happy with the results. They should have been tender, but I found them

cooked uneven.

I think the reverse sear is still the best on the Kamado.

 

Some of the chicken dishes look interesting, going to have to try them.

Cheers,

don

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John,

Thus far I have done two recipes from Adam Perry Langs serious barbecue. In both instances I felt like the amount of work that you put into the recipe definitely made for an awesome meal!

The first one was cider brined pork chops with apple jelly glaze page 40. The thing that I can say about these recipes that I like, is the fact that you have layers of flavors that change as you chew and swallow the food. Much like a fine complex wine which I love as well!!! The Brine gave a salty spicy sweet flavor with a slight hint of Apple, whereas the seasoning blend gave more of an Earthy flavor followed by the glaze which was sweet With a burst of Apple. I would recommend using very thick pork chops with this recipe so you have more time for basting before you reach the optimum 145° temperature that you're looking for to get a beautiful juicy chop! I started the cook over direct heat at about 350° using one chunk of applewood for a little smoke. Then I let the temperature rise to 450° and finished the porkchops up on the top grate of my acorn while basting furiously.

The second recipe used was honey glazed whole turkey breast. I modified this recipe slightly because the turkey was a honey brined turkey breast bone in from Wegmans. I skipped the injection used the seasoning blend glaze and finishing dressing. When I'm mixed up the glaze and tasted it I really believe I could've just drank it as is I loved the sweet vinegary flavor that the thyme and marjoram leaves totally set off. I believe the turkey breast would've been excellent just served at that point but the finishing dressing gave it more complexity with the lemony chives combination. I seared the skin on the top of the breast about four minutes over direct heat at 400°, before putting the smoking stone in place and finishing it indirectly bone side down. That is when I basted heavily. I changed the finishing temperature A

PL said to cook to 165 I went for 160 and then tented the breast with foil as it sat out on the cutting board absorbing some of the lemony chive goodness for about 10 minutes.

In conclusion, I can't wait to try other recipes from this book and as I do I will add to this post.

Cheers to great food,

Frank

I do agree that you get layers of flavor by using this cook book. It is not the one you will reach for if you are in a hurry but if you have some time IMO you do get a nice result using his multilayered approach. Any of the  APL recipes that i have done have been great and worth the effort and you really do not spend a huge amount of  extra time.

 

This is as compared to some of the Emril recipes that looked great on paper and were time consuming and I ended up saying why did i spend all that time for a nothing special result. After doing around five Emiril recipes like that i just quit  using his.

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John,

Thus far I have done two recipes from Adam Perry Langs serious barbecue. In both instances I felt like the amount of work that you put into the recipe definitely made for an awesome meal!

The first one was cider brined pork chops with apple jelly glaze page 40. The thing that I can say about these recipes that I like, is the fact that you have layers of flavors that change as you chew and swallow the food. Much like a fine complex wine which I love as well!!! The Brine gave a salty spicy sweet flavor with a slight hint of Apple, whereas the seasoning blend gave more of an Earthy flavor followed by the glaze which was sweet With a burst of Apple. I would recommend using very thick pork chops with this recipe so you have more time for basting before you reach the optimum 145° temperature that you're looking for to get a beautiful juicy chop! I started the cook over direct heat at about 350° using one chunk of applewood for a little smoke. Then I let the temperature rise to 450° and finished the porkchops up on the top grate of my acorn while basting furiously.

The second recipe used was honey glazed whole turkey breast. I modified this recipe slightly because the turkey was a honey brined turkey breast bone in from Wegmans. I skipped the injection used the seasoning blend glaze and finishing dressing. When I'm mixed up the glaze and tasted it I really believe I could've just drank it as is I loved the sweet vinegary flavor that the thyme and marjoram leaves totally set off. I believe the turkey breast would've been excellent just served at that point but the finishing dressing gave it more complexity with the lemony chives combination. I seared the skin on the top of the breast about four minutes over direct heat at 400°, before putting the smoking stone in place and finishing it indirectly bone side down. That is when I basted heavily. I changed the finishing temperature A

PL said to cook to 165 I went for 160 and then tented the breast with foil as it sat out on the cutting board absorbing some of the lemony chive goodness for about 10 minutes.

In conclusion, I can't wait to try other recipes from this book and as I do I will add to this post.

Cheers to great food,

Frank

I do agree that you get layers of flavor by using this cook book. It is not the one you will reach for if you are in a hurry but if you have some time IMO you do get a nice result using his multilayered approach. Any of the APL recipes that i have done have been great and worth the effort and you really do not spend a huge amount of extra time.

This is as compared to some of the Emril recipes that looked great on paper and were time consuming and I ended up saying why did i spend all that time for a nothing special result. After doing around five Emiril recipes like that i just quit using his.

Cheers to great food,

Frank

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Interesting Marty, I sent the quote without sending my reply. I had heard a lot of the same things about emerils cookbooks. These cookbook threads that John is proposing would have a really cool effect. That's being that we could all try different recipes and then report back on which ones were outstanding which ones were okay and which ones were not worth the effort. Every time I try a new recipe from any one of my cookbooks, I Google it to see if anybody has any comments on that particular recipe. Only about a quarter of the time do I find anything on individual recipes and whether they're good or not. This would be a great timesaver for the whole group.

Cheers to great food,

Frank

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