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Here in New Mexico, the indigenous and Mexican traditions call for searing thinly sliced red meat over a wood fire and eating this with bread, chiles and fried potatoes.

You can find thinly sliced filets of red meats at most all Mexican grocers, and thin cut rib eyes of bison, buffalo, filets of mutton and venison at local whole foods style grocers all over the country.

What you do is set your coals and wood up for medium-high to ultra-high heat searing and cook to desired doneness, preferably medium-rare with charred bits and no grill marks. Frequent turning creates a great crust on the outside of the meat.

You then tear apart chunks or thinly slice the meat, place it in a flat piece of fried but flexible bread dough, add a piece of roasted chile, preferably Hatch green, and then top with some fried potatoes and salt.

Navajos make frybread in cast iron skillets with lard after frying potatoes and a little onion. Mexicans make sopapillas. You can by mixes for these and they taste similar. You can even fry thin round flats of pizza dough till lightly browned.

Fold this up and enjoy!

Seared Coffee and cocoa rubbed bison rib eye filet sandwich:

I just rubbed some bison rib eye filets with coffee, cocoa, spices and hot chile oil and seared them over pecan wood. Roasted green chiles, fried potatoes and onions went in a homemade frybread with the meat.

The gamey flavor is important to the dish as this is true frontier food!

I would love to know if anyone else cooks like this on their kamado!?

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A friend of mine who is of Mexican heritage taught me how to make carne asada which sounds much like what you describe, except the beef is domestic skirt steak sliced paper thin. You marinate it over night in beer with lemons, limes, sliced onions, cilantro, and sliced seeded  and roasted serrano chilies. You grill it on a hot flame and then eat it with warm tortillas, roasted chillies, and sliced radish and salt as a side. It cooks quickly in just minutes.  Really nice  good tasting dish. An Argentine guy who used to work for me, grilled ribeye medium rare, sliced it by hand very thin, and then served it with crusty bread and chimichurri sauce. Also much the same and also very good. I continue to make both dishes and they are always crowd favorites. They work really well for large groups, partly because they are so simple, and partly because they are so very very good.  

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How thin are we talking?  Like Fajita thin?  I have done cheese steak from paper thin rib eye....  What you posted sounds interesting, can you post up some pics of a cook or two with more detail?

You can actually use meat up to 1/2 " unless you plan on slicing a thick piece thin manually afterward. But the crusty surface area is important to the flavor here, although both ways taste great.

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A friend of mine who is of Mexican heritage taught me how to make carne asada which sounds much like what you describe, except the beef is domestic skirt steak sliced paper thin. You marinate it over night in beer with lemons, limes, sliced onions, cilantro, and sliced seeded  and roasted serrano chilies. You grill it on a hot flame and then eat it with warm tortillas, roasted chillies, and sliced radish and salt as a side. It cooks quickly in just minutes.  Really nice  good tasting dish. An Argentine guy who used to work for me, grilled ribeye medium rare, sliced it by hand very thin, and then served it with crusty bread and chimichurri sauce. Also much the same and also very good. I continue to make both dishes and they are always crowd favorites. They work really well for large groups, partly because they are so simple, and partly because they are so very very good.

I see you live in AZ. So you've had the Navajo version with mutton and chiles? Navajos don't marinate like Mexican cooks, but they sure know how to butcher and use a sheep for the most flavorful dishes ever! They both use tortillas and Navajos grill those too. The Argentinian chimichurri is excellent and so are salsas and chopped chile topping of all kinds. As you said, it's a method with variant ingredients to produce a similar result --fast flavorful comfort food hot off the grill.

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That's right Toe, I actually had that fixed by a korean painter who was working on my fathers home. He lit up a small hibachi type grill and took the sliced meat from a cooler, which also held lettuce and a liquid spice mixture. He cooked the sliced steak up for lunch and offered me and dad some. It was great tasting stuff, and makes for a nice memory.  

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