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Is spatchcock necessary on a Kamado?


Nick2cd
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It's turkey season so I'm thinkin of doing one. In the past, I've brined and cooked indirect on my Kamado with zero problems. Everything was moist and delicious. So my question is, why is spatchcock necessary? For direct cooks? For gassers? Seems like kamados keep everything so moist it's almost unnecessary. Am I wrong in my thought process?

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I don't feel spatchcock is ever necessary to cook anything - it's just a different technique for a different finished product. You can definitely cook indirect, but at least with smaller birds like chicken, going direct provides a much different flavor and of course presentation, plus cooking time, than whole, where you'd have to rotisserie otherwise.

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I like to spatchcock whole chickens over cooking them upright because they cook a lot faster. I like that I can cook a chicken, I'm talking 5-6 pound monster here, in 45 minutes instead of 90 or so. I also like opening up that meat inside and getting a nice char on it and searing in my seasonings and stuff. As for a turkey, I would probably only do that if I was making something like a Turducken or something crazy like that. Turkeys seem to cook reasonably fast, judging from everyone's cooks here, so I am not going to go through the trouble or mess of hacking one apart BEFORE it's cooked.

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I've always found beer-can to be a waste of time. That is, the actual can or container of beer, not the vertical roasting orientation. It has never, to my palette done anything for the taste at all. Rotisserie in every case has always turned out a much better bird - better looking, and much better tasting. Over coals, it's the wood-burning smoke that's going to give a lot of the great taste, plus of course the rub and/or baste. But nothing on the planet beats a spatchcock chicken over direct coals. And sorry, technically not "spatchcock" but butterfly - cut down the breast bone, not the back. That's the way all "frango no churrasco" is done. Mmmmmm.

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I'd agree that there is no discernible difference between beer and water in the can, but I do notice that the liquid will give the chicken almost a braised, fall-off-the-bone texture that you don't find when cooking it without, 

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I've done chicken both ways, vertical and spatchcock. Most recently I did the APL "Honey-Glazed Spatcthcocked Chicken". That was the best grilled chicken I have ever eaten! The Flavors are amazing but I was impressed by the smoke that this produced, spewing out the top like a chimney! Most smoke I have ever produced on the Akorn. I will be doing this again soon and hope to have some pics available.

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