John Setzler

Smoked Turkey on the Kamado Joe

8 posts in this topic

Nice cook, John! The bird looks great. I'm quite interested in the vent technique u mentioned. I'm going to have to try that myself.

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Could you elaborate a bit on the warning you made regarding the temperature probe. I couldn't find the side note on YouTube but it may be cuz I'm viewing from an iPhone.

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Could you elaborate a bit on the warning you made regarding the temperature probe. I couldn't find the side note on YouTube but it may be cuz I'm viewing from an iPhone.

 

I have had several instances when cooking at 350 and above with a maverick probe where the probe reads higher than actual temperature after a while. I think the higher temperature causes the probe to get hot enough that it radiates heat down the probe causing it to read higher than actual temp.  It's more of a problem in the 375 and up range but I have had the problem multiple times with two different probes cooking in that temp range.

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Nice looking bird.I noticed that you didn't use a drip pan,any reason for that?

 

I wasn't planning to make a gravy from the drippings.

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