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JRufus

DIY Outdoor Kitchen advice

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We did a major porch and patio project last year, but unfortunately I did not invest enough in the "kitchen" section. I have a 7ft X 3ft kick out on the patio that currently holds my egg and my old gasser. I was at least smart enough to run gas to this section so it is ready for an outdoor kitchen set-up. I would like to do a stone set-up to hold my BGE, small work surface, and I will be buying a top mounted 3 burner gas grill. My question is this something that can be a DIY project or should I bring in a professional. If any of you have done something similar on your own, where did you find the plans?

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What about drawing up what you want and then getting a couple of bids just to see what kinda cost you are looking at. Then you can weigh the cost of your time against the pain to your wallet. I would think a concrete block guy could build the structure to hold your cook top and kamado. Maybe even do a concrete counter top. you could stucco, brick, or stone, the block to make it match your house and yard. I know nothing about block work or brick, but I built a block structure at my last house by setting the block with thin set on a level concrete patio slab. I drilled holes into the slab and slid rebar into the holes and then stacked the block over the rebar, mortaring it into place as I went. (kinda like lincoln logs or leggos)  I filled the block with quickcrete. It actually looked pretty good. I was happy with it and you couldn't move the thing an inch, unless you hit it with a mack truck. ( Not knowing what the heck I was doing, it did take me quite a while to finish it) Good Luck

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You mentioned you want to do a stone setup. That could mean many things. Maybe you could be more specific.

 

If you google stone block bbq island, there are a few examples of small islands that were built out of block like Belgard Weston wall. Stone blocks are very easy for a do it yourselfer. One of my coworkers built a small island for his grill out of stone blocks like the Weston wall and it looks nice and maybe a little rustic. I built a large firepit and seating area out of the same block and it looks great. Key is to lay it out first on paper. Then build it on your patio without adhesive, then once your happy...pull it apart and reassemble it with adhesive. Making sure the blocks are level when laying each course is key. Otherwise it will be a mess after you glue a few layers. The blocks aren't always even thickness, so shims are mandatory.

 

You can go cmu, but that gets a little more complicated with cutting & mortaring the blocks, reinforcing with rebar and then eventually veneering or applying stucco.

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Speaking of concrete block.   This product (Quickwall) also works if you need to build a concrete block wall and do not wish or are not experienced to do it with the traditional mortar joints.  I have used it in the past on various projects and it works at least for walls a few feet tall that I have built.  It is a Portland cement product with 1/2 glass fibers mixed in it.  

 

http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/QuickwallSurfaceBondingCement.asp 

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I knew very little about brick but made a outdoor kitchen shaped like a L and the back of it is a brick wall. I studied how to do it, and made the story board and figured out how thick my mortar joints would be, then did it. I got better as I went, and one problem I ran into was the mortar changed colors slightly as I went did not know enough to buy all of it at the same time. Cutting bricks was not hard, constantly mixing mortar was a pain could have used assistant.

 

Anyway, I built a wall with studs like a house and used hardyboard sheet 4x and then screwed in half of the brick ties which you embed in the mortar joints. I used durarock and tile for the working side. If you are really into doing it, it can be very rewarding but its a lot of work.

Don't forget about some low voltage lighting and perhaps power outlets. 

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I knew very little about brick but made a outdoor kitchen shaped like a L and the back of it is a brick wall. I studied how to do it, and made the story board and figured out how thick my mortar joints would be, then did it. I got better as I went, and one problem I ran into was the mortar changed colors slightly as I went did not know enough to buy all of it at the same time. Cutting bricks was not hard, constantly mixing mortar was a pain could have used assistant.

 

Anyway, I built a wall with studs like a house and used hardyboard sheet 4x and then screwed in half of the brick ties which you embed in the mortar joints. I used durarock and tile for the working side. If you are really into doing it, it can be very rewarding but its a lot of work.

Don't forget about some low voltage lighting and perhaps power outlets.

Mismatched motor is mainly due to time in the drum, ambient conditions, and inconsistent source water batch to batch..

If you are buying it by the just "add water sack" it's is environmental and user variances that change the appearance.

Curing is quite an amazing chemical reaction.

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Oh and sorry to hijack this thread. 

 

 

 

I knew very little about brick but made a outdoor kitchen shaped like a L and the back of it is a brick wall. I studied how to do it, and made the story board and figured out how thick my mortar joints would be, then did it. I got better as I went, and one problem I ran into was the mortar changed colors slightly as I went did not know enough to buy all of it at the same time. Cutting bricks was not hard, constantly mixing mortar was a pain could have used assistant.
 
Anyway, I built a wall with studs like a house and used hardyboard sheet 4x and then screwed in half of the brick ties which you embed in the mortar joints. I used durarock and tile for the working side. If you are really into doing it, it can be very rewarding but its a lot of work.
Don't forget about some low voltage lighting and perhaps power outlets.




Mismatched motor is mainly due to time in the drum, ambient conditions, and inconsistent source water batch to batch..
If you are buying it by the just "add water sack" it's is environmental and user variances that change the appearance.

Curing is quite an amazing chemical reaction.

 

I think it was user error and getting OJT, I may have purchased different brands (doh!) but honestly unless I point it out with the weathering (aka dark mold that get all over everything) and time no one has ever noticed unless I point it out. I did enjoy laying brick and even made downspout splash blocks out of brick to match the house (they had a lot left over). It does look great, but I am having to totally redo everything else but the brick due to the steel 2x4's totally rusting out and the stucco not holding up well. My next frame will be the narrow concrete blocks and faced with corrugated metal and pressure treated wood, with tile top (hope to reuse the expensive italian tiles). Something like this but with weathered and old looking metal. 
a5583fd80593edd60c1e4efa1920fcfd.jpg

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